plastics in the ocean





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  1. #1
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    Default plastics in the ocean

    don't know how close to the truth this is:

    http://www.dw.com/en/plastics-to-out...13226-xml-atom

    but I imagine it's not far off.

    currently 1 ton of plastic to 3 tons of fish.

    At the rate the Spanish and Chinese fleets are hoovering fish up off the coast, I wouldn't be surprised if fish were a real rarity in another 35 years.

    Plastic wrappings really really pee me off.

    we had the perfect opportunity 15 years ago to ban plastic bags and replace with paper, but no.....

    McDonalds and KFC serve their meals in brown bags and environmentally friendly cardboard - only beverage containers are plasticised - yet environmentally friendly woolworths and Pick n Pay give you heaps of plastic....

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    Default The Green Thing

    Reminds me ...

    In the line at the store, the cashier told an older woman that she should bring her own grocery bags because plastic bags weren't good for the environment.

    The woman apologized to him and explained, "We didn't have the green thing back in my day."
    The clerk responded, "That's our problem today. Your generation did not care enough to save our environment."

    The cashier was right -- our generation didn't have the green thing in its day.

    Back then, we returned milk bottles, soda bottles and beer bottles to the store. The store sent them back to the plant to be washed and sterilized and refilled, so it could use the same bottles over and over. So they really were recycled.

    But we didn't have the green thing back in our day.

    We walked up stairs, because we didn't have an escalator in every store and office building. We walked to the grocery store and didn't climb into a 300-horsepower machine every time we had to go two blocks.

    But she was right. We didn't have the green thing in our day.

    Back then, we washed the baby's diapers because we didn't have the throw-away kind. We dried clothes on a line, not in an energy-gobbling machine burning up 220 volts -- wind and solar power really did dry the clothes. Kids got hand-me-down clothes from their brothers or sisters, not always brand-new clothing.

    But that old lady is right; we didn't have the green thing back in our day.

    Back then, we had one TV, or radio, in the house -- not a TV in every room. And the TV had a small screen the size of a handkerchief (remember them?), not a screen the size of the Northern Cape.

    In the kitchen, we blended and stirred by hand because we didn't have electric machines to do everything for us.

    When we packaged a fragile item to send in the mail, we used a wadded up old newspaper to cushion it, not Styrofoam or plastic bubble wrap.

    Back then, we didn't fire up an engine and burn gasoline just to cut the lawn. We used a push mower that ran on human power. We exercised by working so we didn't need to go to a health club to run on treadmills that operate on electricity.

    But she's right; we didn't have the green thing back then.

    We drank from a fountain when we were thirsty instead of using a cup or a plastic bottle every time we had a drink of water.
    We refilled writing pens with ink instead of buying a new pen, and we replaced the razor blades in a razor instead of throwing away the whole razor just because the blade got dull.

    But we didn't have the green thing back then.

    Back then, people took the car or a bus and kids rode their bikes to school or walked instead of turning their moms into a 24-hour taxi service.
    We had one electrical outlet in a room, not an entire bank of sockets to power a dozen appliances. And we didn't need a computerized gadget to receive a signal beamed from satellites 2,000 miles out in space in order to find the nearest pizza joint.

    But isn't it sad the current generation laments how wasteful we old folks were just because we didn't have the green thing back then?
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  4. #3
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    Default

    Its a huge problem. There are 7 or so main areas around the worlds oceans where plastic islands have formed due to the currents etc. The largest is The Great Pacific Garbage Patch

    I hate plastic with a passion. It is used far too casually and even when it is really required there is probably an environmentally friendly alternative solution (hemp derived plastic for example)

    I dont think most people realize how much of their trash ends up in the oceans or they would surely do something about it

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  6. #4
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    Default

    As someone working in the plastics industry I blame consumers. Plastics are great but if users aren't prepared to recycle (technology has been around since the late 70's and improving ever since) then you will have a problem.

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    Default

    At least there are some people trying to solve this problem, but there is not nearly enough support from governments. They should add this to the climate change agenda as well, and maybe get some support from there.

    Have a look here:
    http://www.theoceancleanup.com/

    Pretty cool idea.
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  10. #6
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    Default Re: plastics in the ocean

    I have spent some time reading up on plastics, recycling and related industries, and also the effect of consumerism on the environment, we are in for some serious sh*t in the next few decades, I don't even think we can avert what we are heading for! The number of replies to this post confirms that most people are a) blissfully unaware of the seriousness of the matter or b) just could not give a damn. I said to my wife the other day, if I had known what I know today, the planning of our family would have happened (or not) with a lot of discussions around the very existence of our planet in its current form. I am very concerned for the future and well-being of the next generation/s. Being 'Green' is not optional anymore, even Clarkson's chirps about burning fuel, rubber and massive horsepower is not funny to me anymore!

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  12. #7
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    Default Re: plastics in the ocean

    In May we went on holiday in near Inharrime in Mozambique, The Chinese ships enter Mozambique waters without authorization , and then dump massive amounts of plastic junk.
    The area looks like its un-touched with only a few locals catching fish with spears en beach nets, but the beach is polluted with empty plastic junk.
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    Default Re: plastics in the ocean

    Quote Originally Posted by Apocalypse View Post
    don't know how close to the truth this is:

    http://www.dw.com/en/plastics-to-out...13226-xml-atom

    but I imagine it's not far off.

    currently 1 ton of plastic to 3 tons of fish.

    At the rate the Spanish and Chinese fleets are hoovering fish up off the coast, I wouldn't be surprised if fish were a real rarity in another 35 years.

    Plastic wrappings really really pee me off.

    we had the perfect opportunity 15 years ago to ban plastic bags and replace with paper, but no.....

    McDonalds and KFC serve their meals in brown bags and environmentally friendly cardboard - only beverage containers are plasticised - yet environmentally friendly woolworths and Pick n Pay give you heaps of plastic....
    Apoc

    Appropriately as you are now in the heart of consumerism heaven. I know your post is a while ago.

    Plastic bags are significantly more environmentally friendly than paper bags. You only need to go past one paper mill to realise this. I had the misfortune of paddling past one and had to deal with the subsequent effluent as well. So we did well not to jump on the paper band wagon. The reality is that paper products are far more harmful to the environment than plastic.

    What we need is a better approach to recycling. Currently we pay the government a subsidy while we "buy"a thicker plastic bag that can be reused. This money was supposed to be used by Plastics SA (Formerly the Plastics Federation of SA) and government to help improve the recycling industry. As things stand this money is vanishing into the government coffers with no means to trace it. Google Buyisa ebag to follow it. The former director of the Plastics Federation after trying to resolve the issue legally withdrew the organisation from Buyisa as it was not performing its mandated function.

    So today we pay money to the government for no return. In the interim the bags are getting thinner again as their is no checking. When Buyisa was introduced it forced many small companies that employed thousands to close as their old equipment was not able to produce to the specifications introduced with the new laws around buying the bags.

    Most plastics are made from oil residue after the fractioning process. So it starts life effectively as using what would otherwise be burnt in the large ships as Heavy fuel oil. Today Plastics are even made form rotten milk and other organic substances as like humans they are made from long chain hydrocarbons.

    Plastic is one of the easiest and most energy efficient materials to recycle. The problems arise when the plastic is presented mixed and dirty. The energy required to sort and separate these is huge and the washing required wasteful. If plastics can be sorted at home and placed in the right bins it makes the cost of recycling significantly less. This rarely happens in SA. Most separated recycling just being dumped in the same land fill.

    Also making bags bio-degradable is counter productive. For instance a company like Tuffy make all their bags out of recycled material. Tiger brands as a marketing gimmick put an additive in all their bags to make them more bio-degradable. This et back most recyclers significantly as they could not guarantee the quality of the recycled material. All of a sudden bags were tearing as these so called bio-degradable bags were weakening the recycled bags. A lot of effort goes into making plastic lasting. The trick is to use that effectively in recycling it for maximum effect.

    The plastic floating in the ocean should be harvested and recycled. It is effectively a vast reservoir of free raw material.

    Just for thought.
    Bic Pens, Shatterprufe rulers and Thermal fleeces (Most greenies wear these quite happily) are recycled coke bottles.
    Lasher tools makes a great wheelbarrow using 100% recycled shampoo bottles. They are working on the wheels using recycled car batteries and car tyres.
    As mentioned earlier most bin bags in SA are recycled.
    There are companies making recycled paint buckets.
    A lot more recycling goes on than we realise. The sadness is it is a fraction of what could be possible. The availability of recycled is limited as the municipalities are not geared up to sort the waste and just shove it into the landfill.

    The South African Plastics converter association members take a voluntary levy to assist with the recycling initiatives in this country.

    Some further reading.
    http://www.treehugger.com/culture/pa...now/page2.html
    http://science.howstuffworks.com/env...r-plastic1.htm
    http://www.allaboutbags.ca/papervplastic.html
    https://ecomyths.org/2014/05/27/myth...-than-plastic/

    About Buyisa
    http://www.greenbusinessguide.co.za/...stic-bag-levy/
    Sadly Monya came late to the party and does not have ready access to her bosses predecessor who resigned over his lack of ability to make Buyisa work. He could not derail the ANC gravy train. Sadly despite being a very large employer in South Africa his falling on his sword went largely unnoticed.

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  15. #9
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    Default Re: plastics in the ocean

    Hi Alex,

    I haven't read through all the posts yet, but you're right. It's a horrible problem.

    I hate that all the vegetables I buy come in plastic containers with plastic wrap over the top - and those that don't...they'll put in plastic and even more plastic.

    We went for a walk on these beautiful Betty's Bay beaches, and in one walk, we (just 2 of us) collected enough plastic and fishing line to FILL a huge (plastic!) garbage bag! I plan on piling it up on the beach, taking a photo and sharing it all over Facebook.

    I don't think most people get it yet.

    Sometimes I have the idea that the universe is a huge living thing - each planet is a cell, and humans are a type of cancer which is killing the host cell. Dark thinking, I know, but we're increasing in numbers, growing all the time

    And...there I go again, voicing my personal opinions. I really need to get my own personal profile here, instead of a business one. Can't keep my "mouth" shut!

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  17. #10
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    Default Re: plastics in the ocean

    So ocean levels are not rising because of global warming. It's because of all the plastic. How could we have missed this
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  18. #11
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    Default Re: plastics in the ocean

    Here's a column I wrote on the subject for Die Burger in January this year:

    GROWING up as a kid in Somerset West in the 1960s, the word “plastic” was initially almost a swear word – anything that was cheap and nasty was labelled “plastic”. The word was even used to describe people who were insincere – they were “plastic”. Cheap cars were “plastic”. Toys made of plastic were sneered at. Clothes made from nylon or polyester were “plastic” and low class.
    The irony was that my late father worked as an engineer for AECI, the biggest South African producer of synthetics like PVC. And my mother and her friends soon discovered the wonders of plastic and began hosting Tupperware parties where they sold plastic food containers to their friends on a commission basis.
    Now the world is drowning in plastic. A new study called “The New Plastics Economy: Rethinking the future of plastics”, coordinated by the Ellen MacArthur Foundation, was presented last week at the World Economic Forum in Davos. It is a stark wake up call, and is a fascinating read (it can be downloaded from the Foundation’s website).
    The headline grabbing statistic is that by the year 2050, there will be more plastic by weight in the world’s oceans than there will be fish.
    That’s a staggering prediction, given that mass production of plastics only began in the late 1940s and early 1950s. Polystyrene was first produced in the 1930s, polyethylene terephthalate (PET, widely used now for plastic bottles, and called polyester when used in clothing) was first discovered in 1941, and polypropylene in 1954.
    In our household, we religiously recycle everything that can be recycled, and when we shop, we are constantly on the lookout for packaging that reduces its plastic content. The result is that most weeks, despite being a family of four, we barely fill a quarter of a wheelie bin for the council to take away to a landfill site. We easily fill the equivalent of a full bin for our recyclers to collect.
    But here’s the depressing thing about plastic – the MacArthur Foundation states in its executive summary that “most plastic packaging is used only once; 95% of the value of plastic packaging material, worth $80-120 billion annually, is lost to the economy. Additionally, plastic packaging generates negative externalities, valued conservatively by UNEP at $40 billion. Given projected growth in consumption, in a business-as-usual scenario, by 2050 oceans are expected to contain more plastics than fish (by weight), and the entire plastics industry will consume 20% of total oil production, and 15% of the annual carbon budget.”
    The report examines a way forward which will embrace “circular economy principles” with the ultimate goal of finding a future in which plastics never enter the waste stream because recycling becomes much more efficient.
    “The New Plastics Economy… envisages a new approach based on creating effective after-use pathways for plastics; drastically reducing leakage of plastics into natural systems, in particular oceans; and decoupling plastics from fossil feedstocks.”
    Currently, eight million tons of plastic enter the oceans worldwide, the equivalent of one rubbish truck a minute. If nothing is done, this will increase to two trucks per minute – 16 million tons a year – by 2030, four trucks a minute by 2050, most of it plastic packaging.
    Locally, there is so much more that could be done to cut down our contribution to the crisis. As I have mentioned here before, a simple trick adopted by the City Council here in Cape Town has been to string a thick rope across the Black River – much of the plastic waste dumped into the river higher upstream or transported into it via stormwater drains, is trapped by the rope, and then removed by Expanded Public Works job creation teams.
    But why oh why must I, as a private individual, have to pay a private company to come and remove my carefully collected recycled waste? When is municipal recycling going to become the norm, and not just the exceptional “pilot project”. Let’s do our bit to create a circular plastic economy, and once again make “plastic” a swear word.
    Last edited by Tony Weaver; 2016/08/02 at 06:18 PM.
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  20. #12
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    Default Re: plastics in the ocean

    Tony I agree with everything except your last line. Plastic should not be a swear word.

    Managed correctly Plastic does not need to be a swear word.

    Lets take a plastic Wheelbarow. It is entirely made from recycled material. The bin takes 45s, the frame takes 1 minute and the rim and tyres take 40s each. This is assembled in under 5 minutes and outlasts a steel wheelbarrow by a factor of 3. A steel wheelbarrow lifespan in industrial use is 8 months. A Plastic one 2 years and counting. The energy and environmental impact required to make a steel wheelbarrow is a 100 tim more environmentally unfriendly. Both can be recycled again though the energy factor on the steel is again 100 times that of the plastic.

    Plastic allows us to make a 4x4 with fuel tanks that no longer leak in the heat. That weigh significantly less and as a result are less harmful to the environment.

    Plastic is a valuable part of modern society. We need to rethink how we treat our waste. Plastic is not the problem we are for throwing it away.

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  22. #13
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    Default Re: plastics in the ocean

    And, of course, the recent floods helped ...............

    https://www.enca.com/south-africa/du...er-heavy-rains
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    Default Re: plastics in the ocean

    DiscoMatt is right. I enjoyed his posts! All the plastic did not walk into the oceans by itself.

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    Default Re: plastics in the ocean

    Education in the rural areas is urgently needed, especially those areas lying along rivers and shoreline where there is no such thing as service delivery. If residents don't burn their own rubbish it is recycled into toys for kicking or wind turns it into fence ornaments and the very same water resources that supply the majority of protein are being badly affected by litter, plastic or otherwise. Nature Conservation needs to step up.

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    Default Re: plastics in the ocean

    Quote Originally Posted by springant View Post
    Education in the rural areas is urgently needed, especially those areas lying along rivers and shoreline where there is no such thing as service delivery. If residents don't burn their own rubbish it is recycled into toys for kicking or wind turns it into fence ornaments and the very same water resources that supply the majority of protein are being badly affected by litter, plastic or otherwise. Nature Conservation needs to step up.
    This has nothing to do with Nature Conservation that must 'step up'. This education starts at home and in the schools.

  26. #17
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    Default Re: plastics in the ocean

    As long as people believe its your civic duty to litter to create jobs for picking it up, we will never get anywhere.

    YES, millions actually believe that.
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    Default Re: plastics in the ocean

    So the only way there will be a real change is an economic incentive.

    Government needs to tax (can't believe I suggested it) the making of plastic and fund the recycling.

    I believe there is structures like that in place all ready but it needs to be so rewarded that people start dredging the sea to get the valuable plastic from the oceans beaches and bushes.

    Already there is quite a recycling business model but this needs to be improved.

    New plastic must already be loaded with the cost of recycling.
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    Default Re: The Green Thing

    Quote Originally Posted by Gaitshi Gubib View Post
    Reminds me ...
    Ja Oom Gaithshi, I remember it well.
    Folks today should really try re-cycling instead of throwing away / replacing, wasting.
    Only the consumer will change the habits of the manufacturers by voting with their cash - probably not going to happen too soon.
    I believe there is some plan under way to "harvest" some of the plastic floating in the oceans, but what about all the stuff that has dropped to the ocean floor.
    And it's not only the oceans that need a clean up.
    If we didn't mess it in the first place we wouldn't need to spend even more resources to clean it up.
    I do notice that in our area more people are re-cycling paper, plastic (orange bags collected by I think SAPPI??) and many are re-using shopping bags, even the plastic ones, while others have bought re-usable cloth bags.
    Answering the call of the wild is just so much beter than answering the telephone.
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    Default Re: plastics in the ocean

    Quote Originally Posted by Mal Hannes View Post
    So the only way there will be a real change is an economic incentive.

    Government needs to tax (can't believe I suggested it) the making of plastic and fund the recycling.

    I believe there is structures like that in place all ready but it needs to be so rewarded that people start dredging the sea to get the valuable plastic from the oceans beaches and bushes.

    Already there is quite a recycling business model but this needs to be improved.

    New plastic must already be loaded with the cost of recycling.

    Stat with the import tax for Chinese junk (sorry, consumer goods) that break before you have unpacked the items and read the manual.
    Use this extra cash for education on environment and recycling this will kill two birds with one stone.

    The money is there to act, the Chinese products are getting costlier so local production becomes viable again.
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