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  1. #301
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    Default Re: You never know what's out there

    OK, so starting with the 1st pic. Some of you might have read my attempts at becoming a mechanic when after 8 years of owning a Land Rover I bit the bullet and decided to carry out my own oil change. Well flush with the success of that little episode and wearing my SANP HR hat I convinced Theuns, he's the poor gent tasked with turning me into a mechanic, to accompany me to Skilpad and look at one of their pumps which needed a little TLC. As you can probably see TLC wasn't going to crack that one.

    After bringing it back to Port Nolloth and stripping it down I took it down to Cape Town only to find that most of the parts needed no longer exist. Oh well, an interesting exercise. Ended up with a new pump which is still sitting in my garage, hopefully it will be back in operation next week. In the mean time tomorrow I get to service and clean my very first carburettor. Theus is clearly impressed with my progress, he's now talking about welding a new frame on which we will mount the pump and motor before returning them to SANP. Me and a welding torch! SWAMBO will not be happy

    All of that should really have taken a couple of days, unfortunately something called Desert Knights cropped up. This is an annual mountain bike tour through Ai-Ais / Richtersveld TFP. One again through SANP HR I managed to get myself involved, this time running the bar. Theuns, he didn't really know what he was letting himself in for when he accepted my offer of a "free' week in the park. One of the joys of the event is you get to travel parts of the park not normally open to the regular visitors. Gamkab Canyon on the Namibia side, over night camping is a special place. That's my tent, pitched away from main group. Even on an event such as this one you can still find solitude.
    The real reason though was I have only just bought the tent.

    Having decided that climbing up and down ladders to get into my Bundutop was no longer the way to go and the fact that I needed to fiance a replacement gearbox for Jaeger Defender, it had to go.

    Anyway since I was in no hurry to get a replacement I left it until almost the last minute before settling on a Tentco 2.5x2.5 dome tent. Those of you who have mastered the art of putting up one of these by yourself will understand my reluctance to be around too my folk when pitching it. Happy to say that after 6 nights of one night stops I can now say that pitching and packing no longer hold any fears, in fact my Vetgat Toere friends think I'm crazy when I tell them compared to pushing a button, its quiet therapeutic.

    The canoe? After Gamkab the cyclists get to have a day on the river while us workers lug all the beers and tents back into RSA. Couldn't resist the temptation to show the good folk that this old city slicker knows how to paddle his own

    One of the cloudy days came at the end of this trip. I have or should I say had a camera on the Orange river bank. Since we had to travel past it on the way back from Sendelingsdrift I was quiet excited about checking its card only to find that some unhelpful fellow had taken a liking to it and walked off with it.

    Lost camera and more frustration because of the data that I will never get to recover. Thankfully a second camera further towards the river mouth is still in place but that's 3 cameras that I've lost since 2016

    What is really ironic is the one that went missing was moved a short while ago because it had snapped images of people paying it too much attention. I must have upset the gods of camera trappers at some point, will have to make some burnt offerings to appease them. Given my braai skills that shouldn't be too difficult!

    Footprints in the sand? Well I think they below to a Brownie, although I'm open to correction. Out walking the dunes behind Port Nolloth's salt pan with my two dogs and came across a very smelly ostrich carcass. Dogs enjoyed it but my nose was telling me other things. Casting around I found the prints , clearly not from either of my two they were still busy trying their hardest to smell like a dead ostrich.

    After following the tracks I found part of a leg cached in a small bush with the tracks leading off into Alexkor property. Unfortunately its to close to Port Nolloth to risk a camera so every second day I take a walk up to see if the food cache has been collected. Still there today and getting more mummified by the day, especially when the east wind blows which it has been of late. SWAMBO put her cooking thermometer outside, you can see the result, 43.8 degrees!

    But that's enough for now, I need to catch up on sleep in preparation for that carburettor in the morning !
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    Last edited by Keith Newnham; 2019/10/06 at 10:09 PM.
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  3. #302
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    Default Re: You never know what's out there

    Right since this thread is supposedly about what's out there lets talk Brownies, Aardvarks, possible scarce rabbits and other critters for a while

    To say its been a quiet 6 months is very much an understatement. Even during my 5 week ID season where this year I introduced a white flash camera, things have not been as productive as in previous years. Only two triggers in front of the white flash. Pity because it would make identifying animals that much easier.

    Not sure if the white flash upset any Brownies or if they simply were not around in that part of the river. A lack of paste marks and very few spoor suggests they were simply not around.

    It didn't help either when the camera decided to malfunction after the first week. Thankfully Camera Traps CC (https://cameratraps.co.za/) offer really great support, swapped it out chop, chop, so not much time lost.

    It's beginning to look like my Holgat river clan have upped and moved on or have simply dispersed over a much wider range in search for food. Last option, which I'm hoping is not the case is the local farmers have shot them out. I haven't heard of any such incidents and certainly haven't found any carcasses in my travels so hope springs eternal.

    Although inconclusive, my tracking skills still remain pretty basic, I am seeing what I believe to be Brownie tracks south of Holgat which I haven't seen before so its possible they are just widely dispersed.

    My on / off relationship with Alexkor continues. State capture and corruption has reached this part of the world. I heard that Alexkor recently fired their board and have been unable to publish financials on time. You can image with all that going on the last thing they are finding time to do is entertain my requests for access.

    But, ever the optimist I have now gone knocking on the door of De Beers. There's a large breeding seal colony on their Kleinzee property. My new neighbour works for their resupply vessels in port Nolloth, naturally the question was asked.

    So begins a new email trail.


    • Dear Sir, can I come and plant a couple of cameras on your property next to the seal colony.
    • Sorry Mr Newnham, I work in security and am more interested in keeping people out but I've passed your request onto the mine manager.
    • Hi Mr Newnham De Beers have an agreement with Department Environment Forestry and Fisheries (DEFF). They issue a permit and then we say OK subject to rules and regs. Here's the contact details
    • Thanks Mr mine manger
    • Dear DEFF, please can I have a permit to plant some cameras next to the seal colony (That was a BIG mistake).
    • Dear WCBHP (I thought I'd use the project name, might have carried more weight than just little old me asking ) in principal there should be no problem with issuing a permit however. There's always a bl&*dy however in these things!! Because you mentioned working around the seals, they are a Threatened or Protected marine mammal Species, TOPS to you and me, you will need a marine mammals research permit issued by my colleagues over in DAFF. Here's their contact details and the process to follow.
    • As luck would have it DAFF issue permits on an annual basis around the end October beginning November for the following year, maybe my luck is in this time.
    • Dear DAFF, please can I plant some cameras close to the seal colony because I want to prove Brownies are there and if they are, are they behaving the same as their Namibian cousins. Well actually I'm quiet pleased with my self. The submission was a 10 page document plus a full page of literature references as well as a couple of goals achieved since 2016.
    • Dear WCBHP, thank you for your application. DAFF will be issuing the 2020 application form shortly, your application should be submitted using this form which will be sent to you. "sigh"
    • OK, that's the process, if you want to get into the colony and general mining area, suck it up and play by the rules Keith.
    • Finally 2020 application form arrives and after a coupe of amendments to the accompanying motivation / project plan it's sent back and now I wait until 25th October or the 2 weeks after that date for a response. Holding thumbs.


    Aardvarks and scarce rabbits ? One of my cameras picked up what might be an image of a Riverine Rabbit.
    Because these guys are one of our most threatened mammals I'm not going to put the pics up just yet. If they are identified as being Riverine rabbit then I'll let you all know. If they are just another Cape hare making me look kind of stupid then I'll publish them and you can all have a laugh at my expense

    The Aardvark very kindly only gave me a shot of his ears, but I think they are really quiet distinctive. ADU Virtual museum agree with my ID which is kind of cool because I don't think they have been recorded out this way before.

    And then a really fine looking Caracal walked past.

    Tomorrow I'm off to Kook river, a 200 km round trip to service a camera that I haven't been out to since May. SWAMBO tells me the Wes Kus wind is going to be blowing hard tomorrow, hopefully from the south so no dust storms or excessive heat. Will be interesting to see what's out there.
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    Last edited by Keith Newnham; 2019/10/08 at 08:44 PM.
    2004 Facelift Disco 2 - Raine - sold
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    "Land Rovers don't get stuck, people do, so always look before you leap and if you're unsure, don't do it" Chris Horne

    2019 Going back to Kgalagadi but this time without air suspension

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  5. #303
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    Default Re: You never know what's out there

    Thanks for the update, Keith! Always good to read about what you’ve been up to.
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  6. #304
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    Default Re: You never know what's out there

    Thanks Keith, aardvark fans are all ears.
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  7. #305
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    Default Re: You never know what's out there

    Keith, it's time you updated us again on what has been happening in your part of the world. Your adventures are often interesting and always narrated so well.

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  8. #306
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    Default Re: You never know what's out there

    +1

    “Africa changes you forever, like nowhere on earth. Once you have been there, you will never be the same." - Ernest Hemingway

  9. #307
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    Default Re: You never know what's out there

    So what's been happening out here on the wild Wes Kus?

    Well not a lot to be honest, certainly not from a DEFF/ DAFF point of view that's for sure.

    Unfortunately my raised hopes are currently bumbling along on the bottom of a rather rocky out look.

    It's getting close to starting month 3 since my original optimistic application and initial positive signs and still the waiting continues. But ever the optimist a mail received this morning suggests that all is not yet lost.

    Hopefully next week when the silly season is well and truly a thing of the past and government wheels are spinning up to speed I'll get what I'm looking for.

    Time will tell but that's just the first step, still have to get a sympathetic hearing from mine management and hopefully a friendly leg up from mine security.

    It's frustrating in many ways not least because I will need to redeploy some of my cameras as well as design and build a more secure means of deploying them. Which when you consider this is a "security area" I'm deploying them into...

    Lessons learnt from two years ago on Alexkor property come to mind.

    While waiting for all of this to come through I haven't been sitting idly around.

    A third trip into Namibia's Sperrgebiet in early December, this time escorting a French film crew into Bakers Bay was a wonderful way to end the year.

    A much smaller set up compared to the first two trips but nonetheless an experience to remember especially as I was now the "tour leader".

    One would think that years of Vetgat Toere(ing) would have prepared me for this.

    Not a chance.

    This time it was serious and instead of talking #### on the radio and round a camp fire, words like budget, must get shots of behaviour and timeframes were bandied about.

    Mostly in French so I pretended to not understand choosing instead to smile serenely and enjoy the ambiance that Bakers Bay conjures up.

    Getting to Bakers bay is not that difficult except for a dune field that you need to cross towards the end of the ride in.

    Having only crossed it before by following others I was to be honest a wee bit nervous this time. I use an app on my iPhone, Motion-X to create GPS tracks whenever I'm in the veld. It has a nifty map / follow feature and so armed with this I manged to successfully follow the previous trips route only losing the "road" once, thankfully without incident.

    Plenty of videos from the time there which I'll post as and when I get them loaded. Telkom and Eskom between them have really conspired to cause as much chaos as possible over the last couple of weeks.

    As if running a 4 meg ADSL link is not bad enough, Eskom have finally found a way to include Port Nolloth into its load shedding schedules without cutting off Namibia. Net result, well I'm sure you've all been suffering the same quality of service delivery lately.

    Here's one to keep you going for a while

    This Brownie was walking through the seal colony.

    I was lying flat on the sand, feet pointing towards the seals, back supported by a small dune hummock.

    The director was alongside armed with a much more impressive camera.

    We probably looked like a couple of seals, certainly we must have smelt like a couple of seals after the time spent that close to the colony.

    Brownie walked up to us, you could almost see it asking the question, are they or are they not? Before walking calmly on its way.

    Moments like that make me realise just how privileged I am to be there.



    More from the Wes Kus over the next couple of days.

    Compliments of the season and best wishes for the start of the third decade of the 21st century.
    Last edited by Keith Newnham; 2020/01/16 at 09:35 PM.
    2004 Facelift Disco 2 - Raine - sold
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    "Land Rovers don't get stuck, people do, so always look before you leap and if you're unsure, don't do it" Chris Horne

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  10. #308
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    Default Re: You never know what's out there

    Great video!
    Thanks for the update.

    “Africa changes you forever, like nowhere on earth. Once you have been there, you will never be the same." - Ernest Hemingway

  11. #309
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    Default Re: You never know what's out there

    Thank you, very envious.
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  12. #310
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    Default Re: You never know what's out there

    Thank you!

    Hope SWAMBO and the two furry kids are well.

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  13. #311
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    Default Re: You never know what's out there

    Thanks Keith, always look forward to your posts.

    That must have been an amazing experience.

  14. #312
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    Default Re: You never know what's out there

    Right, back to local stuff for a while.

    You might recall me getting excited about a possible Riverine Rabbit sighting. Unfortunately those that know a lot more about these little critters than I do responded to my inquiry,

    "I had a good look at the images. The lack of black on white tail colouring, would exclude the hare species. I also don't think this is a Riverine rabbit, based on the lack of a definitive jaw line.
    The RR's also have thick hairy feet, the tail would not show up so dark, and they have very long ears.
    I think this is one of the red rock rabbits, possibly Smith's (Pronolagus rupestris), which known distribution extends marginally up to the West Coast."

    So not an extension of the Riverine Rabbit range but certainly if Corne Classen is correct then the range of Pronolagus rupestris has just been extended by a good 600 kms One of the delights of camera trapping is finding unexpected species.

    Unfortunately camera trap triggers have been getting less and less through the past couple of years.

    I'm about to start an analysis of the 3 and half years of data to see if I can confirm this trend. Probably wont get many points in a peer review though, but might just confirm my suspicions .

    Another thing missing is raptors. When we came out o Port Nolloth I recall getting excited about the number of raptors that were seen an a daily basis. Jackal Buzzards, Pale Chanting Goshawks and Rock Falcons to name a few. Now I can't recall when I last saw a Jackal Buzzard or a PCG. A pair of Rock Kestrels made an appearance recently but didn't hang around for long.

    On a happier note. I was sitting down to supper when a friend called.
    "Hi Keith I've got a frogologist here wanting to meet you"
    "A what?"
    "A frogologist"

    Hmm, friend is unsurprisingly, an Afrikaans speaker, so thinking I've probably misheard him I so, OK come on round. Whatever it was would get sorted out when we met.
    Sure enough I get introduced to Les Minter, a renown "frogologist" although I suspect he might prefer a different descriptor for his chosen field of interest

    Les was in Port Nolloth with an overseas film crew shooting a BBC documentary on our very own Breviceps namaquensis or more commonly Namaqua Rain Frog. Seems we have soem that are endemic to teh area, which given its name and the almost total lack of rain is to say the least surprising. Interesting chat about frogs, brownies and film crews followed.

    I heard a couple of days later that Les had found a number of frogs on my friends plot so he was happy because the film crew were happy. Its surprising the pressure that builds when a documentary is being shot and the star of the show doesn't perform to schedule. All those last minute dramatic events that we are so used to seeing, they're all true!

    And so back to Bakers Bay. I'm sure I'm not the only one that enjoys being out there and getting images that would look good on the pages of National Geographic but of late I find myself looking more for behaviors and then recording them. Well, OK its another way of saying my images would probably not grace those hallowed pages but the behaviours are interesting nonetheless.

    Have you seen the pics that people post of FB Kgalagdi Sightings!

    So on that note here's a video of a seal mum defending its new born pup from the attentions of a Jackal. Given the almost total disregard seal adults seem to have for seal pups in the colony I was surprised to see this interaction.

    <span class="LrzXr kno-fv">

    That's all for tonight, off to look at the fabled oyster bed tomorrow, or a least an outcrop of it in an old prospectors trench. Should be an interesting days outing and it gets me out of the house while Eskom carry out more "planned maintenance"
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    Last edited by Keith Newnham; 2020/01/18 at 08:59 PM. Reason: Added the rabbit images
    2004 Facelift Disco 2 - Raine - sold
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  15. #313
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    Default Re: You never know what's out there

    Thanks, Keith.

    You don't think the decrease in adaptors is due to drought conditions reducing the amount of prey - small mammals etc?

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  16. #314
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    Default Re: You never know what's out there

    Thanks Keith.
    Most interesting!
    Have passed this onto a friend whose hobby is frogs.
    Raptors seem to be under threat in many areas.

    “Africa changes you forever, like nowhere on earth. Once you have been there, you will never be the same." - Ernest Hemingway

  17. #315
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    Default Re: You never know what's out there

    Quote Originally Posted by Ian.McM View Post
    Thank you!

    Hope SWAMBO and the two furry kids are well.
    Hi Ian, yes SWAMBO and fur kids are doing well. I'm never sure if the smile I get from SWAMBO when I say I'm off for a few days is one of resigned resignation, part of the joys of living with a mad Brit or, a thank goodness peace and quiet for a while.

    Like me Eos is getting old and beginning to show it. When we first arrived in Port Nolloth morning and afternoon dog walks covered anything up to 10kms a day. Now she looks at the weather, looks at me, watches Aesir dance around like a dog that has never been for a walk and makes a decision. Stay at SWAMBO's feet where she can terrorise the odd feral cat that creeps around or join dad. If she stay we go for the long walk, if she comes with it's a shorter, slower walk with rest stops every 30 minutes

    Talking of weather, it's been incredibly hot here these past couple of weeks. Even having the cold Benguela current all but flowing past your front room hasn't helped much. Most un Port Nolloth like that's for sure. Surprisingly this morning it actually rained, just enough to cover the ground but not enough to bother any rain gauges.

    On the question of raptors, I saw a Rock Falcon and a Pale Chanting Goshawk this morning but yes, I think that the drought has really started to impact the food chain here. The veld looks dead with little in the way of green shoots and I'm not seeing so many small foot prints in the sand. All of which must mean trouble for raptors and the larger carnivores.

    Last weeks oyster shell bed hunt was fun but eventually unsuccessful in as much as we never found the old prospectors trench nor any other digging that exposed the bed. We must have been close at one point because I did pick up a lump of oyster shell rich rock. Sadly no pearls or diamonds. Also found what looks like the foundations of an old homestead, might be part of the narrow gauge railway that ran from Port Nolloth to Springbok in the copper mining days. Obviously we'll have to return to investigate further. This time armed with a metal detector.

    There's also a story that does the rounds about the "English Camp". Apparently during 1914, as part of either the first WW or the rebellion of that time against Botha government, a detachment of Witwatersrand rifle were camped just outside of Port Nolloth. We found the rocks marking, painted white but long since weathered, the name, name we need to find the farm they camped on and then the current day owners to ask permission to have a look around.

    The more I find out about Port Nolloth, the more interesting it gets...
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  18. #316
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    Default Re: You never know what's out there

    And we're back as they say from the commentary box. Nearly four years down the line and I finally get a Brown hyena trigger in daylight and it pastes in front of the camera. What more could a poor boy ask for?

    Well my initial reaction was bu**er, I can't see its front leg stripe pattern. Back in 2016 all I wanted was a Brown hyena trigger, now I guess I'm getting picky Which leads nicely back to the question of triggers.

    After wading through over 25k records I've come to the not unsurprising conclusion that I'm not imagining things.

    Attached graph shows the number of independent triggers (IT) compared to camera days.

    A trigger is considered independent after 30 minutes. This is a reasonably well established general time frame used in camera trapping. It means that if an animal triggers the camera and then hangs around causing multiple triggers only the first one is counted. If the same or different animal comes back in under 30 minutes its not counted in the total triggers. As a first step in analysis of the data it works but beyond that it offers little in terms of deeper analysis.

    Camera days has increased as more camera were deployed, but if more cameras were deployed I would suggest that there would be more triggers but the ratios clearly show a dramatic decrease.

    In 2016, albeit only a half year the ratio of camera days to IT's was 3.2:1. In 2017 it improved to 2:1 but 2018 decreased to 5.57:1 and then during 2019 it dropped to 12.26:1.

    These numbers are across all camera stations. Plenty more work to be done on the numbers but that's for another day.

    March will see me welcome my good friend Gasman to Port Nolloth. Looking forward to showing him around. Also heading back to Sperrgebiet to help with collaring project Brownies. That will be a heck of an interesting time and if all goes as planned the French crew will be returning for a few days to fill in any behaviour blanks. All in all an exciting start to 2020.

    Piloerection - As the dictionaries describe it "erection or bristling of hairs due to the involuntary contraction of small muscles at the base of hair follicles that occurs as a reflexive response of the sympathetic nervous system especially to cold, shock, or fright." Brownies typically use this to either intimidate opponents or as a precursor to getting a big fright and legging it

    Here's a short clip from Bakers bay of a Brownie that wasn't so convinced of our seal impersonations. Unlike the previous close encounter this one decided flight was the proper course of action.



    And then to round of this update, a couple of images of the Red Rock rabbit and the oyster shell rock

    Enjoy the rest of the weekend, just don't watch the cricket !
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    2004 Facelift Disco 2 - Raine - sold
    2006 Defender 110 csw - Jaeger

    "Land Rovers don't get stuck, people do, so always look before you leap and if you're unsure, don't do it" Chris Horne

    2019 Going back to Kgalagadi but this time without air suspension

  19. #317
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Kloof
    Age
    63
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    Thanked: 994

    Default Re: You never know what's out there

    Thanks, Keith. Very interesting as usual.

    Hope you document your wanderings with Gasman for us as well.

    That rabbit is intriguing. Never seen a rabbit with no white on its tail before.

    2015 Suzuki Grand Vitara Summit M/T

  20. #318
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Port Nolloth
    Age
    66
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    1,269
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    Default Re: You never know what's out there

    Nearly 4 years of being out on the Wes Kus and I discover a new beach just south of McDougalls Bay. Locally known as Langstrand and it would seem to be as well used as Still Bay to the north of me. Sundays are becoming the day for exploring with Theuns and Cobus, two gents with a long history of The Port and its surrounds. Lucky for me they share my love of the outdoors.

    The goal for last Sunday was once again, find the oyster bed. Topographical maps and local knowledge pointed toward OuBeep and so off we went heading south from Port Nolloth along a sandy track.

    Unfortunately, the oysters remained well hidden but in the process Langstrand was a highlight along with the remains, literally a couple of old pylons, of the OuBeep mine pump station as well as Port Nolloth's very own Dead Vlei. Well maybe not quite, but a carefully composed picture gives an idea of what I'm talking about.

    The guys suggested it was an old mining ground that hit water rather than diamonds and was abandoned.

    As with most treks along the coast in this part of the world you eventually come across a fence line with the usual notices of dire consequences if you walk any further. Sad fact is that most of the fences have fallen into disrepair and its only your own conscience or in my case fear of upsetting one or more mining houses and the subsequent negative impact on applications to seal colonies that prevent me from walking further down a totally unspoilt beach. One day maybe they'll open things up.

    Backtracking we spend some time exploring the old Navy/ Army radio post. Local knowledge adds to the sense of history.

    It's also my first close encounter with Mr. Puffy.

    Walking around the outside of a building, looking for a way in I walk straight past the puffy who was coiled up just inside an air hole built to the wall.

    It was only when I went to walk into the building that I saw him. Torn between an illogical fear of the snake and an inbred curiosity, not to mention a desire to get a picture, I crept two paces forward before the fear element overcame the knowledge element. Discretion being the better part of valour and armed with a cellphone that zooms I decide two steps forward is close enough. So, sorry for the poor pics,he really was an impressive looking puffy but next time I'll have my camera with me

    Cobus, being made of sterner stuff, volunteered to point out where Mr. Puffy was and how close I had walked to him

    From here we drove off in search of the family farm where Julie, Theuns wife, was born. Its now on Alexkor property so we couldn't get to it but we had some fun searching for the place. Given that Theuns was last there 15 or so years ago relying on his memory for landmarks led us up some very old sand tracks before deciding that maybe, just maybe we might have crossed a fence line so time to turn around and head back home.

    Not before a final stop at an old cemetery that was probably used by local farming families. There were about a dozen graves some with simple wooden headstones that had long since faded , others had their plaques stolen while some were little more than indentations in the sand. A really sad picture.

    2019 and now the start of 2020 has seen me driving Jaeger Defender across sand more often than I had previously. It's getting to the point where I'm starting to feel comfortable which probably means I'll need the spade on the next outing.

    I'm also reading a book that raised a question in my mind. We all know about deflating tires to improve traction through sand, but how long has this been common knowledge? Any one care to offer up an answer?

    To give you a hint, I came across the following passage. Its almost an autobiography, definitely not a Wilbur Smith novel

    "Goodhouse lies ninety miles from Kalkfontein through ninety miles of desert. Whenever we met with heavy sand, which was every mile or two, we had to deflate the tires to half strength to obtain a gripping surface, and as soon as we reached firmer soil we had to get out and pump them back to their original size under a boiling hot sun, a grueling task which we performed a dozen times during the day, and it took us sixteen hours to reach our destination."

    Oops too much ramble, not enough pictures. OK another behaviour one from Bakers Bay. Excuse the wobbly video, hand holding a 600mm zoomed in bridge camera isn't the easiest thing in the world.



    Hopefully the iPhone pics will load the right way up




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    Last edited by Keith Newnham; 2020/02/05 at 09:15 PM. Reason: Ice cream break
    2004 Facelift Disco 2 - Raine - sold
    2006 Defender 110 csw - Jaeger

    "Land Rovers don't get stuck, people do, so always look before you leap and if you're unsure, don't do it" Chris Horne

    2019 Going back to Kgalagadi but this time without air suspension

  21. #319
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Walker Bay
    Age
    76
    Posts
    9,230
    Thanked: 1034

    Default Re: You never know what's out there

    Puffies are masters of ambush.
    Their camouflage is tops so you don't easily see them.
    That was a large specimen!

    “Africa changes you forever, like nowhere on earth. Once you have been there, you will never be the same." - Ernest Hemingway

  22. #320
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Kloof
    Age
    63
    Posts
    406
    Thanked: 994

    Default Re: You never know what's out there

    Eish! Now imagine reinflating your tyres after every patch of sand with a manual pump. Surely they could have just driven on slowly with the deflated tyres?

    2015 Suzuki Grand Vitara Summit M/T

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