Tanzania Elephant Poaching





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  1. #1
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    Default Tanzania Elephant Poaching

    Seems the bad news flows thick and fast out of Africa!

    http://www.news24.com/Green/News/Tan...rophe-20150602


    "Arusha - Elephant census figures released by Tanzania show a "catastrophic decline" of around 60 percent over the last five years, leading wildlife trade monitoring group Traffic said on Tuesday."


    Is there anywhere on this Dark Continent where conservation news is, on the balance, a good story?? (Perhaps only Botswana?)

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    Africa need to wake up soon, I already fear that my grandchildren will never see a rhino in the wild.
    Toyota

  3. #3
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    Shocking!

    “Africa changes you forever, like nowhere on earth. Once you have been there, you will never be the same." - Ernest Hemingway

  4. #4
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    Some background here in a column I wrote for Die Burger in March:

    Man Friday, March 27 2015
    Tony Weaver

    ONE of my most perfect memories of travelling in Africa was a moonlit night bush-camped on a hill looking out over the Selous Game Reserve in southern Tanzania. The rain had stopped, the terrible miggies that had plagued us earlier had gone, and we sat around a low fire sipping our drinks, listening to the African night. The cicadas were out in full, in the distance a lone hyena howled.
    Suddenly the cicadas fell silent, and we became aware of an eerie, hard to describe, shuffling sound, very soft, almost inaudible. A few twigs snapped, and then we were surrounded by hundreds and hundreds of elephants. We sat dead still as they ghosted past us in the moonlight, mesmerised, aware that we were among some of the most traumatised elephants in Africa.
    The year was 1993, and we were travelling through an area that had been on the frontline of the terrible elephant wars that were waged throughout Africa from the mid-1970s until the late 1980s, when the conservationists slowly began to turn the tide and win the war. The Selous was one of the battlegrounds.
    In 1976, an aerial census counted 109 419 elephant in the vast, 54 000km2 reserve. Ten years later, in 1986 – the year the poaching tide began to turn - their numbers had dropped by almost half to 55 153, and when we were there, seven years later, there were 52 230 left.
    Then came the slow period of recovery. By 2006, the elephant population of the Selous had risen to 70 406. But now a new wave of poaching, far more ruthless and efficient than ever seen before, is decimating Africa’s elephants. We are all acutely aware of the scale and extent of the rhino poaching scourge, especially because much of it is happening within our borders.
    But elephant poaching is happening to the north of us on an industrial scale. Last year, a new aerial census was done in the Selous. The outcome was shocking. There were just 13 084 elephants left, a decline of 67% since 2010.
    “The threat of local extinction feels very real,” says Mike Chase, director and founder of Elephants Without Borders.
    This week, a key elephant conservation meeting, the Africa Elephant Summit, is being held in Kasane, that delightful little town on the Chobe River in Botswana, a town where elephants regularly wander down the main road. The summit began on a sobering note, with delegates from some 20 countries (including the main destination for poached ivory and rhino horn, China) being warned that the African elephant is facing extinction in the wild in mere decades.
    “This species could be extinct in our lifetime, within one or two decades, if the current trend continues,” AFP reported Dune Ives, senior researcher at Vulcan, a philanthropic organisation run by US billionaire Paul Allen, saying. “In five years we may have lost the opportunity to save this magnificent and iconic animal.”
    Every major decline in Africa's elephant population correlates closely with major wars on the continent – wars mean guns and guns mean poaching. But now the poaching has taken on a more sinister turn – counter-terrorism experts warn that there is a growing congruence (toenadering) between poaching, organised crime, and terrorist organisations like Boko Haram and Al Shabab. Ivory and rhino horn is being used to finance terror.
    Back in Kasane, delegates were told by the IUCN - The International Union for the Conservation of Nature – that our African elephant population has dropped from 550 000 in 2006 to 470 000 in 2013. East Africa has seen the worst decline, from 150 000 to about 100 000.
    And as it becomes tougher to kill rhino, and the numbers drop, our elephants in southern Africa – the strongest and healthiest populations left in Africa – will become the hunted on Africa’s new frontline. It’s only a matter of time.
    [email protected]

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    Until we treat this ivory "war" as an actual war there is virtually no hope of saving the elephant or the rhino. In a war you kill the enemy and as a sideline you try to win the hearts and minds (and implement projects like the "Campfire Project where the locval population is in partnership with the good guys and not the bad). Funny how Botswana seems to have the problem mostly under control yet nobody else does. Does a shoot to kill policy work? It seems to...

    Until every country adopts a war footing against poachers and the kingpins they will loose the war, finished and klaar! It will be a war of attrition to see who lasts the longest, the supply of poachers or the remaining elephant / rhino.

    Secondly we have to open up the CONTROLLED trade. And please please please don't come with that drivel about it being detrimental to the asian populations. If they can't look after their own then tough titties! It's much akin to saying please don't have a boomed off and armed response neighbourhood as it merely drives the crime across the road... well once again tough titties! Mark my words when the last african elephant and the last black and/or white rhino is shot they WILL move on to the asiatic populations!

    So until we get real and actually go to war against these syndicates we may as well take a lot of pictures to show our grand kids because they wont see the real thing anymore.
    Gary
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    We have only one world. One beautiful earth. One beautiful and unique Africa. And this is what we do... We are so destructive and corrupt.
    Says a lot about human nature both the destructive and corrupt aspect and the courage to fight it.
    Michael
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    “It's a terrible thing, I think, in life to wait until you're ready. I have this feeling now that actually no one is ever ready to do anything. There is almost no such thing as ready. There is only now. And you may as well do it now. Generally speaking, now is as good a time as any.” – Hugh Laurie

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by mic_zw View Post
    We have only one world. One beautiful earth. One beautiful and unique Africa. And this is what we do... We are so destructive and corrupt.
    Says a lot about human nature both the destructive and corrupt aspect and the courage to fight it.

    Too right! Bring on the meteorites,the asteroids, the volcanos,the floods, the Ebola's, the calamities-the world-no, humanity-needs a wake-up and shake-up!

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    Shocking article about elephants in Tanzania:

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worl...re-seeing.html
    Toyota

  9. #9
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    Thanks for posting!

    “Africa changes you forever, like nowhere on earth. Once you have been there, you will never be the same." - Ernest Hemingway

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