Zambia hunting of leopard & lion starting up again





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  1. #1
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    Default Zambia hunting of leopard & lion starting up again

    I usually don't care either way about hunting. Hunting, as long as it is handled with conservation in mind. Which in Zambia rarely. This year hunting will be allowed on leopard. Next year lion.

    A couple media links - http://lusakavoice.com/2015/05/16/zambia-lifts-lion-hunting-ban-and-other-big-cats/
    https://firstforhunters.wordpress.co...t-hunting-ban/

    This also affects some designs I had on a GMA, converting it from hunting to a conservation project. Opening up hunting will most likely kill it and any chance of a new camp with campsite.

    If you are against hunting or feel anything for wildlife and those kitty cats, signing this petition may influence that decision. I understand that there are overseas tour operators that are considering cancelling and moving their clients elsewhere already.http://www.thepetitionsite.com/840/4...as-game-parks/

    Additionally, there will be a domino effect for NGO plans involving anti poaching and related that will most likely not happen if this becomes reality.
    Last edited by luangwablondes; 2015/05/17 at 07:02 PM.

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    Personally I have no problem with hunting problem cats.

    The moment anything is banned it becomes exotic, like rhino. And we all know the story. To hunt a cheetah is just stupid to me. [Ja I know it does not make sense]
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  3. #3
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    The ban was triggered by declining lion populations, over-harvesting, hunting underage lions and depletion of habitats for the Lion.

    From 2013 all the above has changed to now make it feasible
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  4. #4
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    Default Reinstatement of lion and leopard hunting in Zambia

    Quote Originally Posted by Chuckzoo View Post
    The ban was triggered by declining lion populations, over-harvesting, hunting underage lions and depletion of habitats for the Lion.

    From 2013 all the above has changed to now make it feasible
    Chuckzoo is correct. A study undertaken by the Zambian Carnavore Programme, published in the Journal of Wildlife Management in 2013, estimated past and future male loss n 3 lion populations in Zambia, including in and around South Luangwa, Lower Zambesi and Kafue National Parks (NPs) and adjoining Game Management Areas (GMAs).

    The principal findings recorded high rates of adult male loss, mainly due to licenced hunting (for trophies) and poaching/lions caught in illegal snares. The bottom line is that there was overexploitation and there needed to be healthy populations within protected areas such as national parks where no hunting is permitted) to enable hunting within GMAs to be sustainable.

    The paper suggested a number of management measures to allow this to occur. This includes the banning of baiting (to attract lions to be shot), strict quotas, particularly on the age of males shot, increases in the trophy fees and the banning of lion hunting. The latter was the measure which the Zambian Government implemented in 2013.

    The key questions I have in my mind are:

    1. Will the lion populations, especially the male populations, have recovered sufficiently by 2016 to make trophy hunting ecologically sustainable? The above paper suggests that a longer period of no hunting was required.

    2. What exactly are the guidelines which the Government are to implement as a Statutory Instrument? Surely these need to be made public at the time of the announcement?

    3. What increased measures are to be implented to combat the scourge of snares which have been shown to be a significant cause of lion deaths?

    4. How is hunting to be monitored and are there safeguards in place to kick-in if the off-take is not sustainable? Again the news release is silent on the need for this back-stop.

    I have not made any comments on the moral and ethical perpsective although I recognise that these values are are valid. Equally, I have not made any comment on the economic impact of lion (and leopard) hunting on the valuable tourism market or on the conservation management of both species. The points made by Luangwablondes are a case in point.

    However, I also accept that trophy hunting, coupled with increased anti-poaching efforts, is sustaiable provided all the checks and balances are in place. I also accept that trophy hunting can and does provide valuable revenue to a country that wishes to promote and utilise all of its wildlife resources. The concern that I have is that the evidence to support the sustanable hunting of large cats is not there at present and it is unclear as to how it will be monitored and regulated.

  5. #5
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    Signed the petition.

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    Do we know how many permits will be issued?

    I cannot see a free for all, being justified after the report that Ronpon mentions. 3 Years just does not seem sufficiant. There could however be other unknown factors at play, in these large areas it may be posibble for prides to group together and cause problems, allowing 1 or 2 cats in that specific area to be hunted a year could serve to spread them out more evenly.

    Problem animals will need to be culled under certain conditions and getting paid by a hunter to target this specific animal rather that paying a ranger to do it makes some sence.

    My question thus is. How many cats will be taken? How many are there? and Who will be deciding which animals to take and where?
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  7. #7
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    In Zambia, you can never tell how many permits will be available in each concession. It appears that it maybe more about economic voodoo theory then sustainability.

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    Signed as well and posted on FB to motivate my friends.
    C-mon guys, take that step and follow Botswana's leadership in banning hunting in and around wildlife areas.
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    Default We can make a difference

    http://victoriafalls24.com/blog/2015...an-on-hunting/

    Our immediate response has given the government Zambian pause.
    Last edited by luangwablondes; 2015/05/20 at 04:49 PM.

  10. #10
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    I am a biltong dedicated hunter ; personally I would not volunteer to be involved in hunting a big cat ; more so and particularly lion , an endangered species....;their numbers are really dwelling .. the loss of habitat -eg former natural range areas ?, loss of natural prey? human conflict ? under age trophy hunting? infanticide ?......must all have a cumulative effect .
    We visited zambia in 2005 and drove to south luangwa and northern kafue; ... hey did we battle to spot lion ! ... finally we walked from Chris Macbride camp in northern kafue and on foot managed to track and spot a male and female who upon seeing us bolted in no time ...;we did not even have the time to take some photos ; all that I managed was to photograph the fresh spoor !
    A lion conservation specialist from Panthera has mentioned that at least "8 years" should be the age for a male lion to be taken ...(the trophy hunting industry apparently is guided by the 6 year old rule ....)
    ....but here is an interesting view by Dr Norton-Griffiths on wildlife utilisation ....
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XjUr...ature=youtu.be
    Last edited by Jayefe; 2015/05/23 at 02:19 AM. Reason: Dr Norton-Griffits

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    Quote Originally Posted by Engel View Post
    Personally I have no problem with hunting problem cats.

    The moment anything is banned it becomes exotic, like rhino. And we all know the story. To hunt a cheetah is just stupid to me. [Ja I know it does not make sense]
    These lions are NOT problem lions and are in Wilderness areas and kill one (Usually the scarcer male) usually results in the death of up to 30 others as the pride is thrown into turmoil. Lion population in the wild are collapsing fast and expets predict that in 20 years from now could disappear altogether ...Cheetah are far more healthy apart from genetic diversity and MANY are found on normal cattle ranches in say Namibia where lion numbers are collapsing and they are absent over most of the country ..Still Don't shoot them. A corrupt PH and client shot the last known male lion in the Damaraland.Kaokoland area ..hunting of cats like must be banned like in Botswana

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayefe View Post
    I am a biltong dedicated hunter ; personally I would not volunteer to be involved in hunting a big cat ; more so and particularly lion , an endangered species....;their numbers are really dwelling .. the loss of habitat -eg former natural range areas ?, loss of natural prey? human conflict ? under age trophy hunting? infanticide ?......must all have a cumulative effect .
    We visited zambia in 2005 and drove to south luangwa and northern kafue; ... hey did we battle to spot lion ! ... finally we walked from Chris Macbride camp in northern kafue and on foot managed to track and spot a male and female who upon seeing us bolted in no time ...;we did not even have the time to take some photos ; all that I managed was to photograph the fresh spoor !
    A lion conservation specialist from Panthera has mentioned that at least "8 years" should be the age for a male lion to be taken ...(the trophy hunting industry apparently is guided by the 6 year old rule ....)
    ....but here is an interesting view by Dr Norton-Griffiths on wildlife utilisation ....
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XjUr...ature=youtu.be
    Spot on accurate

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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Betts View Post
    A corrupt PH and client shot the last known male lion in the Damaraland.Kaokoland area
    No they didn't, they shot one of the Lion study males. There are other males in the area. They may well have been corrupt, but it takes two to tango so there must have been a corrupt government official to have handed out the permit.

    The reason Zambia stopped big cat hunting a couple of years ago was because of all the corruption involved. I can only hope that they have sorted this out in the interim and have systems and penalties in place to deal with transgressors. Why they aren't releasing those guidelines is certainly a worry.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Betts View Post
    kill one (Usually the scarcer male) usually results in the death of up to 30 others as the pride is thrown into turmoil.
    HUH??... Please explain
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  15. #15
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    This is interesting

    "..............These are endangered species of wild cats that are on the brink of extinction. Government figures claim we are privileged host to approximately 4,000 lions and 8,000 leopards. However, even these numbers are hard to substantiate if you compare them with a 2012 study conducted by researchers from Duke University using high-resolution imagery. The study found 4 lions in the Liuwa Plains, less than 50 in Sioma Ngwezi, 386 in the Kafue National Park, less than 50 in Nsumbu and 575 in the Luangwa area sharing borders with Malawi. This translates to about 1,100 lions in the whole country, 3,000 less than the official figure. Numbers for these cats used to be much higher.

    There are several reasons for the decline. They range from poaching, habitat loss and habitat fragmentation, to ill-advised government decisions such as the one Hon. Kapata has just made. But let us for a minute suppose the figures the Government is giving us are correct. Does that justify government-licensed killing of these animals? Is there a study that has been conducted that these animals need cropping? Have the issues that were raised by Hon. Sylvia Masebo, the Minister of Tourism and Arts at the time the ban was introduced, been addressed? The answer to all these questions is ‘NO’...................." This press statement was issued by UPND leader Hakainde Hichilema
    Last edited by mfuwefarmer; 2015/05/26 at 04:09 PM.

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    There's a problem with that statement in that they have ignored all the predators in the GMA's which must be substantial. It sounds, on the face of it, that they have only counted numbers inside the National Parks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RobH View Post
    There's a problem with that statement in that they have ignored all the predators in the GMA's which must be substantial. It sounds, on the face of it, that they have only counted numbers inside the National Parks.
    Hi Rob, I read the Duke University paper and it is a bit fuzzy on what areas were surveyed, but it seems to have actually concentrated on the GMAs. But without access to the empirical data, hard to tell. But it is a good piece of work.
    Last edited by Tony Weaver; 2015/05/28 at 11:43 PM.

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    FYI, here is a piece I wrote for Die Burger last week:

    Man Friday, May 22 2015
    Zambia’s hunting ban

    The announcement that Zambia is to lift a two year ban on the hunting of leopards and lions has created one of those classic conservation dilemmas: trophy hunting is an integral part of sustainable development, but, and this is the big but, are Zambia’s big cats sustainable?
    The country banned the hunting of cats in 2013, saying numbers were dangerously low, and that corruption was leading to abuse and unethical practices. Tourism Minister, Jean Kapata, said this week hunting would be allowed in a “controlled manner”. "We did an aerial survey and established that we have more than 4 000 lions and leopards are in excess of 8 000."
    Zambia is one of my favourite countries, and I have spent many happy times there, working in South and North Luangwa and Lower Zambezi, trundling slowly through the Kafue, Mushingashi, the Busanga Plains, and Liuwa Plains. It is a gem, and has some of Africa’s finest game parks.
    But there is a constant war of attrition between the desperately under-resourced Zambian Wildlife Authority (Zawa), supported by lodges and safari outfits, and poachers – some of them subsistence hunters after bush meat, but increasingly some are well-financed ivory and lion poachers hunting for the Chinese market.
    On my last visit, several lodge owners told me there had been a worrying increase in poaching since the ban was instituted. “The hunters and their guides were the eyes and ears on the ground,” I was told.
    I gave up hunting in my teens, I prefer my wildlife alive and free, and I have a distaste for the practice. But I am a big fan of the role of hunting in conservation – properly managed, it has multiple spin-offs, not least the provision of funds for conservation (the industry brings in between R7 and R8 billion a year in South Africa; wildlife numbers on private land have gone from 575 000 in 1966, to nearly 19 million in 2007).
    So in theory, reopening limited hunting for big cats in Zambia should be a good thing. But will it be in practice? The best answer I have found is an article published in PLoS ONE, the open access journal published by the Public Library of Science (and said to be the world’s biggest peer-reviewed science journal).
    It has numerous authors, but to access the full paper, Google ““Underperformance of African Protected Area Networks and the Case for New Conservation Models: Insights from Zambia PLoS ONE”. The authors reviewed Zambia’s Game Management Areas (GMAs) semi-protected conservation areas that border onto national parks and reserves, and which fall under the authority of local chiefs and chieftainesses.
    And their findings were ambivalent. Among many other things (and their general thrust is in favour of trophy hunting) they said “Earnings for communities from trophy hunting are lower than estimated earnings from illegal bush meat hunting and create weak incentives for conservation….”
    As a result of the 2013 hunting ban, “hunting operators have vacated the GMAs, resulting in loss of their contribution to anti-poaching and creating a vacuum in which illegal activities are more likely to proceed unhindered. Evidence from Kafue National Park suggests that the simple presence of operators has a significant deterrent effect for poachers.”
    On top of this, “there have been few proposals from the photo-tourism industry to take over GMAs in the wake of the hunting ban. The hunting moratorium is thus likely to fuel wildlife declines by reducing: anti-poaching effort and presence in GMAs; (reducing) working capital for ZAWA; and (reducing) incentives for conservation by communities.” A lose-lose situation all around.
    Wildlife politics is a tricky business: the animal welfare lobby is already screaming for the big cat hunting moratorium to be reinstated, the sustainable conservation lobby is saying allow trophy hunting, but control it very tightly. My big fear is that Zambia, and Zawa, simply does not have the resources and the finances to control this one properly – it could be Pandora’s Box.
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    Last edited by Tony Weaver; 2015/05/28 at 11:41 PM.

  19. #19
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    Well written Tony and the dilemma is very obvious.
    However, the same applies to Botswana and they have taken a complete different route, in my opinion better justified.

    I might have a biased view on this but in Botswana we have at least a good reason to utilize the resources forming the BDF for a purpose.

    Long term will show the effects on both approaches so we might have comparable results, for one side, it will possibly be too late to turn around because there is little chance that both methods will succeed.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kalahari Safari View Post
    Well written Tony and the dilemma is very obvious.
    Thanks Walther, this is a tough one to call. I am conflicted, as are many others. Hunting has had an enormously beneficial effect in South Africa, where game numbers and areas under conservation have multiplied exponentially, but has had a terrible effect in countries where there is no proper control and corrupt hunters and officials. So it is a careful balance that has to be monitored. I still believe that where it can be properly controlled (SA, Botswana, Namibia) hunting is a key part of conservation and tourism, much as I don't personally like the practice.
    Last edited by Tony Weaver; 2015/05/29 at 12:25 AM.

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