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Thread: MTB startup

  1. #21
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    You can buy all of this for a fraction of the cost of what you will pay anywhere at Mr Price Sport. Buy cheap and if you are really into it build on that.

  2. #22
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    Cleats from the start differs from rider to rider.

    I clipped in from the first ride, and it never bothered me. Could work the unclipping etc with ease.
    But my one friend, fell about 2 times every time we went out because he couldn't get unclipped (was adjusted correctly...)
    My wife after a year still on tekkies only and enjoy riding that way.
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  3. #23
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    Cleats all the way!!!

    Practice on a soft lawn until you get it right, but it is real easy!
    Everything is a hammer.
    Unless it is a screw driver.

    Then it it a chisel.

  4. #24
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    Invest in a decent helmet, the Bell range starts at roughly R500 worth it as I have seen what happens to entry level helmets when you wipe out on gravel.

    As for the cleats, all the way but there is no guarantee you won't fall no matter how experienced you are...lol
    Suzuki Grand Vitara 2013, 2.4i 4x4 lifted
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  5. #25
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    Don't wheelie until much later. It hurts. I know.
    Jonathan
    Fortuner D4D 4x4 - stuff and things added

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhlippieV View Post
    R100 helmet for a R100 head.
    Get a helmet that fits. That doesn't move around on top of youre head. Daai ding moet stil sit.

    Starting out in cleats is a very bad idea. You dont need them yet. Period. Riding in cleats will be marginally more efficient than tekkies, but it is not as if you'll develop the smooth pedal stroke in a week or two. But learning to handle off road in tekkies will be a lot easier. My wife rode for a year in tekkies, was a good rider, but still struggled with the cleats in the beginning.
    Riding anything mildly technical proficiently needs confidence, and the worry of unclipping will always be in the back of your head.

    I've seen many rookies leaving the sport because they don't like it, and all of them tried clipless too soon.

    Moenie die kar voor die perde inspan nie.
    Just go and enjoy the bike and the outdoors, worry about the gear later.
    This guy makes the most sense!

    To add:

    Buy the helmet that fits and is comfortable and cool. The price is NOT important. Cheap helmets will protect your heart the same as astronomically expensive ones. The main advantage of the expensive ones is the weight and the "style". All helmets sold in SA have to be of a good standard. WEAR IT ALL THE TIME!

    For 90% of people, starting of with flat pedals is by very far the best, especially in mountain biking where you often clip and unclip many times during a ride. The cost of a cheap pair of flat pedals is nothing compared to even the cheapest cleated mountain bike shoes. Ride with flat pedals until you are a few months into it, especially if you want to ride single track (and if you enjoy mtb, you will want to) Many of the best technical riders ride with flat pedals, mainly because it is better in very rough terrain, check the downhill dudes. The long distance guys, marathon riders, all use cleats, simply because it is more efficient. For a beginner, flat shoes and pedals work best, except for a few agile, gifted, driven types.

    Buy a good pair of cycling shorts that fits. Without that you WILL hate cycling. Rather, your bum will. After the first ride your bum will tell you to NEVER to do THAT again. Ignore it, within a few weeks of riding regularly, you will have become "hardegat". Btw, never wear underpants under your cycling shorts. It will chafe because they are designed to wear commando style.

    Think of getting a pair of gloves too. It improves grip when your hands sweat and it prevents blisters.

    Initially, don't let your mate drag you into rides too tough or too long for your fitness level. Start slow and build up incrementally. You should always feel like you could have done a little more. Soon enough, you will be doing the hard and long rides. That is when you start looking at cleated shoes and a good bike.
    Last edited by DJR; 2015/01/17 at 02:17 PM.

  7. #27
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    Wear your helmet, always. If I didn't, I wouldn't be writing this post. And the only differences between a R700 Bell and anything more expensive are weight and looks, not the level of protection.

    And wear gloves. New hands are expensive.
    Niel
    2012 BMW F800GS
    2010 Nissan Navara 2.5 dCi 4x4
    2015 Bush Lapa Miskruier (B503)

  8. #28
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    From your OP that you want to try it out on a borrowed bike i would also suggest a pair of flat pedals and a decent helmet that fits properly.
    4x4 less.

  9. #29
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    Thanks for all the recommendations guys!! Great to get sound advice from people who have or are still involved.
    I've decided to get my own bike and take the plunge. Rather my own and something that i can have readily available to get accustomed to and call my own.
    I've also obviously decided not to go cheap on the helmet option, and i am fully aware that the initial layout $ will be pricey but worth it in the long run.
    I was always on my bike as i kid, even as a teenager. So i have no doubt that i'll get back onto the bike like 1 2 3....
    Once again thank you all for your positive and valued info.
    Platkar driver...
    '99 Land Rover Discovery 3.9 V8i - SOLD
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    I will drive a Land Rover again...

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wayne CH View Post
    I cant disagree more. for someone just starting off, its best to learn to do it right from the start. Cleats make for easier pedalling and offer you more stability in the pedals. to learn without them and then have to go through learning to ride with them is completely counter productive.
    And I couldn't disagree with you more
    Learning on flat pedals (decent ones not the sad little shin biters that tend to arrive with the bike) and a good pair of grippy shoes (5-10's) will allow you to learn your bike skills properly and if you move to cleats later the skills will be properly embedded rather than using brute force to control the bike through the cleats.
    Also there are studies out there showing that in MTB at least cleats do not add a significant amount, if anything, to your pedalling efficiency.
    There is no doubt your bike handling skills improve more with flats.
    Edit - Also decent flat pedals offer a nice size platform that is very stable and allows you to change your foot position if needed. In my case I don't ride cleats for some of the reasons above but also because, thanks to some ridiculous sports injuries, cleats force my foot and knee into an uncomfortable position on the bike.
    Last edited by marko35s; 2015/01/28 at 11:18 AM. Reason: Added a bit more text

  11. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Musashi View Post
    Wear your helmet, always. If I didn't, I wouldn't be writing this post. And the only differences between a R700 Bell and anything more expensive are weight and looks, not the level of protection.

    And wear gloves. New hands are expensive.
    This.
    For all the gumph written about helmets the simple fact is that they all pass the same basic impact tests.
    And the gloves are essential firstly for control and secondly for when you have an unscheduled dirt nap. It will happen.

  12. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by DJR View Post
    This guy makes the most sense!

    To add:

    Buy the helmet that fits and is comfortable and cool. The price is NOT important. Cheap helmets will protect your heart the same as astronomically expensive ones. The main advantage of the expensive ones is the weight and the "style". All helmets sold in SA have to be of a good standard. WEAR IT ALL THE TIME!

    For 90% of people, starting of with flat pedals is by very far the best, especially in mountain biking where you often clip and unclip many times during a ride. The cost of a cheap pair of flat pedals is nothing compared to even the cheapest cleated mountain bike shoes. Ride with flat pedals until you are a few months into it, especially if you want to ride single track (and if you enjoy mtb, you will want to) Many of the best technical riders ride with flat pedals, mainly because it is better in very rough terrain, check the downhill dudes. The long distance guys, marathon riders, all use cleats, simply because it is more efficient. For a beginner, flat shoes and pedals work best, except for a few agile, gifted, driven types.

    Buy a good pair of cycling shorts that fits. Without that you WILL hate cycling. Rather, your bum will. After the first ride your bum will tell you to NEVER to do THAT again. Ignore it, within a few weeks of riding regularly, you will have become "hardegat". Btw, never wear underpants under your cycling shorts. It will chafe because they are designed to wear commando style.

    Think of getting a pair of gloves too. It improves grip when your hands sweat and it prevents blisters.

    Initially, don't let your mate drag you into rides too tough or too long for your fitness level. Start slow and build up incrementally. You should always feel like you could have done a little more. Soon enough, you will be doing the hard and long rides. That is when you start looking at cleated shoes and a good bike.
    Listen to DJR he is an all round good guy and talks sense. Oh and his many years of riding back up what he says. This from him is some of the best advice you will get.
    He may be a dentist but don't let that put you off...

  13. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by blind View Post
    Cleats from the start differs from rider to rider.

    I clipped in from the first ride, and it never bothered me. Could work the unclipping etc with ease.
    But my one friend, fell about 2 times every time we went out because he couldn't get unclipped (was adjusted correctly...)
    My wife after a year still on tekkies only and enjoy riding that way.
    Buy her a pair of 5-10's and she will enjoy it even more, they make a massive difference when paired with a decent flat pedal.
    They are a little expensive (around R1700) but basically last forever and a day.

  14. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by marko35s View Post
    Buy her a pair of 5-10's and she will enjoy it even more, they make a massive difference when paired with a decent flat pedal.
    They are a little expensive (around R1700) but basically last forever and a day.
    She doesn't go fast enough for that to make any impact...
    FORD Ranger
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  15. #35
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    I woke up one morning and decided "I want to start riding MTB".

    Later that day I popped into Hot Spot Cycles and walked out with a brand new Scott Aspect 960........and a pump and two spare tubes.

    I returned later for a helmet that apparently I just had to have, the make and model specifically, at more than R1000, but which they did not have stock of. They sent me to the Gift Acres shopping centre where I bought that new helmet.

    And then I thought now I can start riding..........

    We went to Sondela soon after and diligently the bike went with. I did the staggering total of 4 kilometres there as nobody in my group was remotely interested in cycling, noooooooo, let's rather braai and drink beer...............

    That was in September 2014, and since then I once climbed on it, saw that my 144kg mass of shimmering muscle forced most of the air in the tubes to the top part leaving the rims very close to touching the floor. I put it back in it's parking and since then it's been standing patiently waiting for me.

    I once took it back to Hot Spot cycles and they mounted a cycling computer thingy to the handle bars, and then I took it home........

    I have come to the realisation that I am a. too scared to start, b. too full of excuses, c. not well enough motivated and d. too embarrassed to fit my oversized bulk onto that delicate frame.

    Maybe one day I will find another "newbie" to MTBing in Garsfontein area to ride along, to motivate and be motivated as it helps me zero to have the equipment and not use it. Many experienced riders have said, come with, we don't mind riding slow to wait for you, etc, etc, etc. But I always know it will be a drag for them.
    Last edited by Oldtimer; 2015/01/28 at 12:05 PM.
    Johan De Graaf

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  16. #36
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    just ride!
    FORD Ranger
    Conqueror Courage

  17. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by blind View Post
    just ride!
    Yes, yes, I know................!!!!
    Johan De Graaf

    2018 Ford Ranger 2.2 XL Doublecab
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  18. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldtimer View Post
    I woke up one morning and decided "I want to start riding MTB".

    Later that day I popped into Hot Spot Cycles and walked out with a brand new Scott Aspect 960........and a pump and two spare tubes.

    I returned later for a helmet that apparently I just had to have, the make and model specifically, at more than R1000, but which they did not have stock of. They sent me to the Gift Acres shopping centre where I bought that new helmet.

    And then I thought now I can start riding..........

    We went to Sondela soon after and diligently the bike went with. I did the staggering total of 4 kilometres there as nobody in my group was remotely interested in cycling, noooooooo, let's rather braai and drink beer...............

    That was in September 2014, and since then I once climbed on it, saw that my 144kg mass of shimmering muscle forced most of the air in the tubes to the top part leaving the rims very close to touching the floor. I put it back in it's parking and since then it's been standing patiently waiting for me.

    I once took it back to Hot Spot cycles and they mounted a cycling computer thingy to the handle bars, and then I took it home........

    I have come to the realisation that I am a. too scared to start, b. too full of excuses, c. not well enough motivated and d. too embarrassed to fit my oversized bulk onto that delicate frame.

    Maybe one day I will find another "newbie" to MTBing in Garsfontein area to ride along, to motivate and be motivated as it helps me zero to have the equipment and not use it. Many experienced riders have said, come with, we don't mind riding slow to wait for you, etc, etc, etc. But I always know it will be a drag for them.
    Just start off slowly and take it from there.
    I was just shy of 100kg when I started riding with my, at the time, 9 year old just to allow him to go further than the end of the drive. The first few rides, on flat ground, left me very tired and moaning a lot about the pain the saddle caused but I found that you strt going further and faster very quickly.
    Six months later with no change to diet etc I was down to 82kg and had had a ridiculous amount of fun into the bargain.

    Have a nose at this Hub thread -
    http://www.thehubsa.co.za/forum/topi...since-cycling/

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