How to fit switched 12v power to your Ranger T6 - Page 2





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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Capone View Post
    Exactly, can't agree more - such a circuit is very simple .. any Amperage, mA to whatever the existing fuse will allow - and it will not void the warranty. Plug it into the socket and plug the load in - not even necessary to try and find the fuses or remember to change this back to standard before a service etc..
    Interesting idea. Please post pics/diagram once you’ve build en tested your invention.
    I personally prefer the on/off switching with the ignition key without the engine running, especially for GPS-d/cam.

  2. #22
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    Hi Piet. I will gladly, want to build one anyway for my hot/cold box which uses around 10A and I often have to run back to the trok to unplug it! In fact ... PM your address and give me a week or 2 and I'll make one and send to you to play with, free.

    I agree that for low current applications such a the GPS and cam, your solution is probably the quickest and easiest and it works. At such low currents, there is very little that can go wrong.

    My post was actually more aimed at the person running his fridge, which will probably require in excess of 8A. For this I would honestly not recommend the solder-on-fuse idea due to a number of reasons. The chief concern for such currents are naturally the resistance of the solder joint on the nickle-tin plating of the fuse. Due to amongst others electromigration (especially with DC currents) as well as possible chemical interaction depending on the type and composition of the solder used, the resistance can increase over time and eventually just cause a melt, if not a physical fire (for lower currents such as the GPS, etc. it's not a concern). This is one of the many reasons why the aviation, marine, military and vehicle industries still use the rather expensive crimp on connector methods which provides pure metal on metal contact.

  3. #23
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    Ja must say I have/had the problem with the fridge. Have been running back to the bakkie twice today to unplug the fridge so if you can make a 13v cuttoff switch I would definitely buy one. Most switches I found cut out at 10V. And the fridge I can select between 10 and 12 but I need one for a battery pack with DC - DC charging and it only cuts off at 10V. Can't set it higher. If you can make something I can fit to the battery box that cut out at 13V and only charges when going higher than that it will be even better.

  4. #24
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    Its possible to change the aux sockets to turn off....

    You can hardwire a blown fuse with another fuse from the part of the circuit that does switch. This gives you a solution that both works as needed, as well as be a reliable temporary reversable mod...

    Something simmilar has been covered in this here forum before.....













    Edit: I have just seen, its this exact fred that coverd the hard wire idea.
    Last edited by pierre2013; 2015/04/09 at 10:31 PM.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by rterblanche View Post
    Ja must say I have/had the problem with the fridge. Have been running back to the bakkie twice today to unplug the fridge so if you can make a 13v cuttoff switch I would definitely buy one. Most switches I found cut out at 10V. And the fridge I can select between 10 and 12 but I need one for a battery pack with DC - DC charging and it only cuts off at 10V. Can't set it higher. If you can make something I can fit to the battery box that cut out at 13V and only charges when going higher than that it will be even better.
    I can try to help with your requirement (don't want to make any profit, do it for the love of electronics and trucks!). Please PM me your contact details so that we can discuss specifics without cluttering this thread.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Capone View Post
    Hi Piet. I will gladly, want to build one anyway for my hot/cold box which uses around 10A and I often have to run back to the trok to unplug it! In fact ... PM your address and give me a week or 2 and I'll make one and send to you to play with, free.

    I agree that for low current applications such a the GPS and cam, your solution is probably the quickest and easiest and it works. At such low currents, there is very little that can go wrong.
    Hi Capone - any progress witht our little project?

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Capone View Post
    Hi Piet. I will gladly, want to build one anyway for my hot/cold box which uses around 10A and I often have to run back to the trok to unplug it! In fact ... PM your address and give me a week or 2 and I'll make one and send to you to play with, free.

    I agree that for low current applications such a the GPS and cam, your solution is probably the quickest and easiest and it works. At such low currents, there is very little that can go wrong.

    My post was actually more aimed at the person running his fridge, which will probably require in excess of 8A. For this I would honestly not recommend the solder-on-fuse idea due to a number of reasons. The chief concern for such currents are naturally the resistance of the solder joint on the nickle-tin plating of the fuse. Due to amongst others electromigration (especially with DC currents) as well as possible chemical interaction depending on the type and composition of the solder used, the resistance can increase over time and eventually just cause a melt, if not a physical fire (for lower currents such as the GPS, etc. it's not a concern). This is one of the many reasons why the aviation, marine, military and vehicle industries still use the rather expensive crimp on connector methods which provides pure metal on metal contact.
    Hi Capone - any progress witht our little project?

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