48" or 60" Hi-Lift Jack - Page 2





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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Off Road Dawg View Post
    To Fluffy and all other "experienced know-it-alls" As much as we respect your knowledge and experience being facetious does not help newbies nor does it do the forum any good. My initial thoughts were 'wtf what am I doing here!!!! @$$hole comment like that to someone who asked an honest question' Why not rather enlighten the person instead of being such a troll...... I myself have wondered exactly the same. Long or short? And yes I opted for inflatable... but difficult with a V8 with twin exhausts.... Maybe being sensitive to who is asking and why would help instead of smart alec responses. Not everybody was gifted with knowitall syndrome

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    Unnecessary language. Fluffy is neither a troll nor a smart Alec. Hi Lift jacks are extremely dangerous in the wrong hands, and a highly valuable tool in the right hands. Not being a fan of modifications, I have no idea what the OP means when talking about lifts and wheel sizes, but a couple of points about Hi Lifts may suffice:
    1. A Hi Lift jack is useless if you don't have jacking points. Most offroad vehicles do NOT have appropriate jacking points for a Hi Lift, other than Land Rovers with solid rear bumpers and bull bars, or Cruiser with similar. The jack buddys that attach to wheels are dangerous - the tilt factor kicks in very fast and you can lose a vehicle sideways, or a jack backwards and into your jaw in a split second. Use with extreme care.
    2. Never use a Hi Lift for changing a wheel unless you have adequate safety in place - a tree trunk or a rock under your axle, a buddy to hold the vehicle steady when you remove the wheel, and you are on totally flat ground.
    3. Never, ever get your face between a Hi Lift jack and the handle - you could need plastic surgery or air evac.

    Having said all that, if you know how to use a Hi Lift, it is an invaluable tool. I have been saved a few times by mine.
    Don't be tempted to mount it on the outside of your vehicle because it looks cool. Stow it inside the vehicle with the head wrapped in cloth and greased.
    Never ever mount it on your front bumper because it looks cool - it could take your head off in the event of a collision.
    As to what length jack to get, calculate how high you need to lift your vehicle out of a mud hole (bearing in mind that lifting the chassis, the wheels still stay static until you have extended your springs to their full stretch) and work from there.
    Air jacks are great, but they do take up a lot of space and are not really feasible for long expeditions because of that. For playing and trails they are a far better option than a Hi Lift.
    I would not head out on an overland trip without my Hi Lift, which I have used as a jack, a winch, a mud extraction tool, and as a hoist for removing a gear box. I've also used the ladder section as a bridge, a braai rest and an anchor for a tent in a cyclone.

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  3. #22
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    To get back to the original question. With your lift kit and bigger tires, I would say get the 60inch. It can be a pain to stow away, but the short highlift can run out of lift pretty quickly if you have a decent suspension and wheels and only get the car ever so slightly stuck.

    I would like to differ from those advocating airjacks. I do not like them at all (its a preference thing). The highlift also does more than just work as a jack, which I find useful, and so what if it is dangerous. Off roading is dangerous, that is why we get training, and practice our skills. if we avoided all useful "tools" because they are dangerous if not used properly, how would we get anything done in the world.

  4. #23
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    If you have a vehicle with long-travel suspension, and you want to raise the wheel, wrap a length of chain round the chassis and axle before you do so. The axle then raises with the body.

    The longer the jack, the more dangerous it becomes, and it is a pain to store it inside your vehicle. I originally bought the 4' one but sawed about 100mm off mine. No problems with the length to date.

    Johan
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  5. #24
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    Fluffy is right
    if you are not experienced in using a high lift jack,get one and practise to use it with somebody that is experienced.
    I have only seen them being used a few times but everytime there was some mishap luckily everytime just vehicle damage.
    I wonder what is more dangerous a tow ball recovey or a high lift jack.
    The only inexperienced people that should use a highlift jack is the ones with uncool manners.

  6. #25
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    Thanks for all the replies. Got myself a 48" HiLift. All Sorted.
    Warren
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  7. #26
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    I have 48" on a 3" lifted Cruiser with 33" tyres and it does not lift enough due to a flexi coil suspension.
    Buy the 60", and if its to long, I'll swap you.
    Patrol TB48
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  8. #27
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    60" Hi lift fits behind the rear seats of a Wrangler perfectly.

    buying a small one is like ordering a ladies steak.

    for R100 extra, you can cut the top of if it intimidates you.

    however...

    as the wiser, grumpier, older persons on the forum have mentioned, you may hurt yourself. do be careful.

    if I may be a little improper and a bit of a braggart (hey, it's the first article I've had published, okay>!??!!?!?) , my thoughts on the subject....

    http://4x4community.co.za/forum/show...hlight=article

  9. #28
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    Interesting thread.........I guess I will NOT be purchasing a cool looking Hi lift Jack after all.

  10. #29
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    I do not consider myself to be as experienced in off-roading as some on this forum, but please also do not judge my level of experience by the number of posts made to date on this particular forum either.

    Attached are pictures of a recent experience I had with a high lift jack.
    I do not have my own yet, but after cutting my tyre on a trail, and given the position I was in, it would have been very difficult to replace the tyre without one.
    I was grateful for the help I received and the fact that someone else, with much more experience than me, was able to show me how to use it.

    I learned a few things that is worth to add to this thread.
    1) The wheel travel on the Patrol is such that the high lift jack may not be sufficient. Hence the consideration of possibly a 60" as apposed to a 48"... Having said that, we eventually managed to get the lift needed by applying the normal road jack under the axle, in conjunction with the high lift. Not sure if anyone has done that and what your views are?
    2) The high lift jack seems to have a tendency to slip from its position on the ground. This is at least one reason why it is dangerous. So what could be helpful is to make a larger base for the jack to stand on?
    3) Given the angle my vehicle was standing at, we should have, in hind-sight, anchored the vehicle prior to lifting it, i.e. by tying a recovery strap between my vehicle and the one above me. This is of course in addition to the rocks we placed behind the non-lifted wheels.

    Tony Weaver, and some others, thanks, your posts on this thread was very helpful to me.

    My vehicle has a 2" suspension lift, 2" body lift, and 33" tyres (standard was 31"). I have after market jack points on my sliders and on the front bull bar.

    Fluffy, if I am also wondering about what size jack to get, what would you suggest? Should I also rather not get one?
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  11. #30
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    I think if you have space on the vehicle, go for the 60", simple reason it can lift higher - not that you are going to need it necessarily, but if you find a good jack anchor point, say a 300mm deep hole, then the 60"could still work, while the 48" might just be too low and you would have to make another plan
    High lift jacks are specialized tools, ensure you know how to use it safely
    Christo Davids
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  12. #31
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    I have a hi-lift permanently strapped to my bakkie as do many other guys on their vehicles.

    I have ever only taken it off 2wice to use it. Will always exhaust all other options before using it as a last resort because of a number of safety and other variable factors.

    However, it is and can be a valuable tool if you really need it and know how to operate it safely. I also carry around a wheel buddy and if used correctly and within its limits, it can be a life saver in certain situations.

    (I also have an air-jack.....just BTW)

    It all depends why you want it and if you might ever end up in a situation where you are going to need it as a last resort of rescue.
    '13 Toyota Hilux 4x4 XCab

  13. #32
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    I have a 48" which I used quite a few times on my Discovery 1. Two memorable occasions jump to mind -

    The first was getting stuck to the chassis in a wet riverbed on the Namaqua 4x4 trial (that is why I nowadays just keep quiet when the expert 4x2 drivers talk about doing this route). Only way to get out was lifting one corner of the vehicle at a time, scoop out the sand and built a path with rocks. Backbreaking work, but I got out and an airjack would not have had the same results, as it would have prevented me from building a road under the wheels.

    Second time was having a rear tyre cut on an extreme angle on the Waterval 4x4 trail near Porterville. Because of the angle, it was extremely dangerous to change the wheel and we had to anchor the car to another vehicle, who had to bundu bash to get above me in a safe position. In this case it would have been to dangerous to get under the car with a normal jack, and an air jack would have created the ideal roll down the mountain.

    I agree with the sentiments in some of the above posts, a hi lift is an extremely dangerous machine and you should not attempt using it if you do not know how to use it. Try it out at home first. But if you know how to use it, it has a lot of uses and can get you of trouble when there is no one else to help. I never go on a trip without mine.
    camelman
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  14. #33
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    Sal nerens heen gaan sonder hi lift.
    EX PERD

  15. #34
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    Now that all the good advice have been given regarding hi-lift jack, a few of my own thoughts....but keep all the good advice regarding safety in mind!

    Along with a spade, the hi-lift is my favourite recovery tool for self recovery....it just opens up so many possibilities for recoveries. As metioned, it is a recovery tool, not a tool to change a tyre.

    Being inexperienced, is not a reason not to buy a jack, at least the OP has been for some training. I bought my hi-lift soon after I got my first 4x4, and at that time I was clueless about 4x4's....I only did my first official 4x4 training 8 years later. Before using it the first time, I read up as much info as possible.

    In almost 20 years I've never hurt myself or seen someone on an outing with me get hurt....because we treat the hi-lift with the respect it deserves....same kind of respect I give my firearms.

    Jacking points are a really good idea, but I personally have never had them on any of my vehicles. One attachment I like a lot is the "jack buddy" that allows you to hook onto the spokes of a wheel and lift the wheel directly.

    I have done many recoveries where we used the full length of the 60" jack to recover a vehicle....without the extra length some recoveries would not have been as easy.

    The biggest issue for me is storing it in or on a vehicle, but there are always around it. As Tony said, watch out where and how you mount it, it can take your head off.

    If you do get one, first read up on how to use it and watch youtube videos. Then play with it at home in a calm unstressed environment, learn how it works and how it reacts in certain situations. The worst thing people can do is buy the jack and expect to use it efficiently and safely when they are really stuck, and probably more stressed than usual. That's when logical thoughts go out the window and people get hurt.

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  17. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fluffy View Post
    Anybody asking what size highlift jack shouldn't be buying a highlift jack.
    What many forumites seem to forget is that its not only the guy who started the thread that is interested in the answer. There is an amazing wealth of knowledge contained in the minds of this forum. Even an expert can learn something he never new.

    So when you make a negative comment you stifle conversation and send the thread off on the wrong tangent. Some advice. Give the facts, pros and cons and then your opinion and dont be sarcastic. This way we all can learn something.

    Im sure you have something to contribute in the way of knowledge and experience.

    Wow and I was only going to post two words and they weren't Good Morning or Thank You
    Last edited by RichardLesar; 2014/03/21 at 06:35 AM.
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  18. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barto View Post
    Now that all the good advice have been given regarding hi-lift jack, a few of my own thoughts....but keep all the good advice regarding safety in mind!

    Along with a spade, the hi-lift is my favourite recovery tool for self recovery....it just opens up so many possibilities for recoveries. As metioned, it is a recovery tool, not a tool to change a tyre.

    Being inexperienced, is not a reason not to buy a jack, at least the OP has been for some training. I bought my hi-lift soon after I got my first 4x4, and at that time I was clueless about 4x4's....I only did my first official 4x4 training 8 years later. Before using it the first time, I read up as much info as possible.

    In almost 20 years I've never hurt myself or seen someone on an outing with me get hurt....because we treat the hi-lift with the respect it deserves....same kind of respect I give my firearms.

    Jacking points are a really good idea, but I personally have never had them on any of my vehicles. One attachment I like a lot is the "jack buddy" that allows you to hook onto the spokes of a wheel and lift the wheel directly.

    I have done many recoveries where we used the full length of the 60" jack to recover a vehicle....without the extra length some recoveries would not have been as easy.

    The biggest issue for me is storing it in or on a vehicle, but there are always around it. As Tony said, watch out where and how you mount it, it can take your head off.

    If you do get one, first read up on how to use it and watch youtube videos. Then play with it at home in a calm unstressed environment, learn how it works and how it reacts in certain situations. The worst thing people can do is buy the jack and expect to use it efficiently and safely when they are really stuck, and probably more stressed than usual. That's when logical thoughts go out the window and people get hurt.


    Got to agree with all the above, ESPECIALLY the practice and maintenance parts.

    No point buying one, strapping it stylishly to the bull bar and forgetting about it until you need it 2 years later.

    practice using it somewhere flat, get the hang of the mechanism and the jack buddy and base, make sure you know where the hard points are on the vehicle.

    Then maintenance - Tony mentions above that he keeps his in the car and packed in grease... well, mine is in the car (the big one fits perfectly behind the back seats of a JKU) but grease - to me anyway - is a no no , in sand a greased mechanism will jam in no time. To be fair, in mud it's probably better because it will keep the mud out of the mechanism for the period of use....

    mine is washed off periodically (after use) and just Q20 or WD40 sprayed on the mechanism - and I keep a can in the car for when I'm using it - you want those pins to slide nicely...


    Also remember - a high lift jack does not work without load. you'll struggle like hell with it on it's own in the garage.

    get one, and play with it. won't hurt you.... much..... okay, maybe a lot, so be careful!

  19. #37
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    oh yeah, they can also be used as come along winches, glue clamps, body/chassis straightening rams, press, tyre bead breaker....

    very very useful!!!

  20. #38
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    High lift smack in your face

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=61Hwm0ei1UM

  21. #39
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    As jy dom is dan moet jy maar bloei.
    Daardie jack se springs en penne is seker lanklaas gediens. Hy gebruik dan sy hand on die pen te re-set.
    EX PERD

  22. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patroller View Post
    High lift smack in your face

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=61Hwm0ei1UM
    and THIS is why we lubricate the mechanism!!!

    those pins should slide in and out like.... erm... well, like something sliding in and out of something really slippery....
    Last edited by Apocalypse; 2014/03/22 at 08:51 AM.

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