Anatolian Shepherd dogs helps cheetah numbers





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  1. #1
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    Default Anatolian Shepherd dogs helps cheetah numbers

    Just read this article.
    http://http://voicesofafrica.co.za/d...ne-in-namibia/

    Gist of article is that by using dogs to protect their goats, farmers have less stock loss to ie cheetahs. This in turn leads to to farmers not hunting them to prevent stock loss.

    As I have stated in a previous thread, my next door neighbour has a Anatolian Sheep Dog with his herd of goats. No stock losses in past year to Caracals!
    And we have them around here. Where his goats are we used to find spoor and twice in past couple of months we have seen mother Caracal with two pups. And where is your camera when you need it...
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    Excellent solution by you and your neighbour.
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    I saw something on this 3 or 4 years ago, (the scheme was initiated by a charity) and wondered at the time whether these dogs would actually be tough enough to live in Africa. Are they OK with the weather and the insects, and how is their immunity to disease? How do they not end up cross-breeding with the local dogs?

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    No problems this side of world. That would be Southern Cape. Dog get dosed for ticks with the goats and that is basically the only issue round here.
    Weather wise the dog handles wet and hot no problem.
    As for other dogs...just chases them away as they are seen as a danger to 'it's' flock.
    Dogs are spayed or neutered when released with a herd.
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    It's initiated by the cheetah sanctuary - my neighbours at work

    On the other side is a brewery .

    Nice place to work

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    Good friend of mine, as well as quite a few other farmers, in the Cedarville and Kokstad areas are also making very successful use of these dogs. But in those areas it is more for protection against jackal and lynx.

    I have also seen quite a few of them put to very effective use with the Namas in Namibia.

    The only sad part for me is that you have to keep yourself from treating them like pets (other dogs) - if you use them as working dogs.

    Awsome farm dogs. Great solution.
    Last edited by Jean Kotze; 2013/08/27 at 09:15 PM.
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    * Off-Topic
    I know they use the dogs in the Cederberg as well to look after sheep with great success. My mom has a Anatolian Shepherd/Boerboel Cross. Came from a Cederberg farm, Anatolian male, that is usually in the field with the sheep, bred with farmhouse Boerboel bitch. What a lovely, mild mannered, very intelligent dog. Stella is a 52kg bitch, very protective, needless to say, no beggars knock on my parents gate.

    These are from about 1 year ago, meeting my 9 week old beagle, they are great friends.



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    Last edited by dumbluck; 2013/08/27 at 09:15 PM.

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    My FIL use these dogs with great results.
    They stay with the sheep herds on his farm in the Free state.
    Almost no stock loss for the past 10 years.
    Last edited by AlbertG; 2013/08/27 at 09:19 PM.
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    Brilliant idea.

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    There is a project by SANParks in the west coast nat park area to supply the surrounding farms with these dogs and leopard numbers have been positively influenced. Their size is enough to intimidate most predator and they are super protective of their flocks, often only tolerating the owner to approach
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    My brother-in-law uses them near Hofmeyr in the Eastern Cape. My sister breeds Ridgebacks.

    They are VERY careful to keep the AS's and Ridgebacks separate.
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    A friend of mine also has two of these dogs in his sheep herds in the north western part of the Free State. He is very happy with them and they don't only keep predators at bay, but also those that see a sheep as a fast take a way.

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    We have one living in Durban . She is 6 yrs old and weighs 55kg. Grew up in town and children from age 0-4 are her flock. Nothing not evan gardener comes close. Do have 5 acre property

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    They use these dogs in the Baviaanskloof farming area as well.
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    The owner of the Wagon Wheel 4x4 Route, now called Karoo Adventures because they also have a series of zip-lines in the kloof, also use them to protect his sheep against leopard and caracul. He told us they work very well, but once in a while one of them "turns" and starts catching sheep itself, just like many farm dogs tend to do.

    On the farm they also use those little elastic bands to amputate the lamb tails at an early age to prevent diseases, resulting in the tails sometimes lying around in the veld. The dog smells the bit of blood, comes and eats them, and pretty quickly learns where these little snacks come from, at which point they sometimes start eating the tails off the lambs before they'd been properly amputated. Then, of course, it's just a matter of time before they realise that the rest of the lamb and/or sheep tastes the same as the tail...

    He also said they would attack literally anything or anyone coming too close to the sheep, meaning that they'd also attack and kill a steenbok or duiker, which under normal circumstances would not feel threatened by the sheep at all and might come and graze among them, but now it is seen as a threat by the "shepherd".
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    [QUOTE=stadleroux;1834648]The owner of the Wagon Wheel 4x4 Route, now called Karoo Adventures because they also have a series of zip-lines in the kloof, also use them to protect his sheep against leopard and caracul. He told us they work very well, but once in a while one of them "turns" and starts catching sheep itself, just like many farm dogs tend to do.

    On the farm they also use those little elastic bands to amputate the lamb tails at an early age to prevent diseases, resulting in the tails sometimes lying around in the veld. The dog smells the bit of blood, comes and eats them, and pretty quickly learns where these little snacks come from, at which point they sometimes start eating the tails off the lambs before they'd been properly amputated. Then, of course, it's just a matter of time before they realise that the rest of the lamb and/or sheep tastes the same as the tail...

    He also said they would attack literally anything or anyone coming too close to the sheep, meaning that they'd also attack and kill a steenbok or duiker, which under normal circumstances would not feel threatened by the sheep at all and might come and graze among them, but now it is seen as a threat by the "shepherd". [/QUOTE


    I am just repeating what I have heard from friends that farm in the Karoo ( near Beaufort West ) They have reported that they have heard about this but have never experienced it.
    They reckon this comes from incorrectly feeding these dogs and sometimes even forget to feed the dogs.
    If this is incorrect please don't shoot me.

    Chris.

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    I have read quite a few articles about these dogs and they seem to be an excellent solution for protecting sheep and goats. I have never spoken to a farmer who owns one and am sure that it would be an interesting conversation.


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    Regarding the feeding of the dogs. My next door neighbour's goats are kraaled every night, whether in the veld or near the house. He has kraal in every 'kamp' that he has.

    They have a self feeder for the dog. She chows before being let out and obviously again when kraaled with the goats. All workers have to do is to check if self feeder is sufficiently full.

    As for water the dog drinks where the goats go, either dam or river which we have here.

    Obviously it is not advisable to have 'tail titbits' in the veld. But then it is a process that takes a couple of days and it would have been prudent to keep sheep in a separate 'kamp' till they have lost their tail bits.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisLab View Post

    I am just repeating what I have heard from friends that farm in the Karoo ( near Beaufort West ) They have reported that they have heard about this but have never experienced it.
    They reckon this comes from incorrectly feeding these dogs and sometimes even forget to feed the dogs.
    If this is incorrect please don't shoot me.

    Chris.
    Well, I don't know the guy, we just chatted about the dogs, but he also uses the self-feeder and he said they had a very specific diet of dog pellets only, so I don't know...

    Quote Originally Posted by Errol View Post
    I have read quite a few articles about these dogs and they seem to be an excellent solution for protecting sheep and goats. I have never spoken to a farmer who owns one and am sure that it would be an interesting conversation.
    Was very interesting to talk to this guy indeed! He had a long conversation with us about the dogs and about how conservation has become a big money-spinning industry for various organisations and ngos.

    Quote Originally Posted by Prof View Post
    Regarding the feeding of the dogs. My next door neighbour's goats are kraaled every night, whether in the veld or near the house. He has kraal in every 'kamp' that he has.

    They have a self feeder for the dog. She chows before being let out and obviously again when kraaled with the goats. All workers have to do is to check if self feeder is sufficiently full.

    As for water the dog drinks where the goats go, either dam or river which we have here.

    Obviously it is not advisable to have 'tail titbits' in the veld. But then it is a process that takes a couple of days and it would have been prudent to keep sheep in a separate 'kamp' till they have lost their tail bits.
    I also thought there had to be a way to manage this situation, for example by keeping a human eye on the lambs for those couple of days until they've lost their tails, because I'm sure that must be a huge problem when they're not guarded by dogs as well, as the scent of the dropped tails lying around in the veld would probably attract a lot of attention from predators too.
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    I saw this a Spier where they have the cheetah sanctuary. A very elegant solution to sticky problem. They told some fantastic stories of injured dogs returning to the flock by escaping from the house while recovering. They apparently build a very strong bond with the sheep, they said that the dogs never attacked the sheep because of that bond.
    At Spier they breed the dogs and donate them to farmers. The dogs themselves are very expensive.
    Last edited by Biggles; 2013/09/08 at 05:19 AM.
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