4x4 Recovery that went horribly wrong - Page 5





Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5
Results 81 to 100 of 100
  1. #81
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Pretoria
    Age
    59
    Posts
    7,447
    Thanked: 862

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SimonB View Post
    The one thing that got me wondering about the "recovery" that started this thread...

    I was under the impression you should always try recover in the direction the vehicle came from (unless circumstances like access by the recovery vehicle dictate otherwise). ............
    Your logic serves you well Simon. The only time I'd recover a guy forward under those circumstances are:
    1.The rest of the convoy has gone through, and there's no way of getting around him to tow him back.
    2. Lifted his nose out of what-ever he's stuck in using a highlift jack or airbag, and packing rocks under his wheels, in which case he can often drive out himself.
    3. If forward was the ONLY option, then my first choice would have been to winch.

    Snatching would have been VERY low on my list of options. I've seen a kinetic rope take out the rear ARMOURED window of a Ratel troop carrier. I guess that cured me from willy nilly just jumping into snatch recoveries. A lot of people have absolutely no idea what they are messing with.
    Sakkie Coetzee

    Some people say I have a "short temper"....I see it as swift and assertive reaction to Bull!

  2. #82
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Uitenhage
    Age
    40
    Posts
    1,809
    Thanked: 375

    Default

    Just a question.

    A Defender's "drop plate" is bolted to the chassis at the top and it is reinforced horizontally by two lengths of angle iron bolted to the chassis underneath the vehicle. It is rated to tow a braked trailer of up to 3.5 tons. If one used a "towmaster" tow hitch (similar to what trucks and tractors use to tow with, it has a ball at the top of a thick pin, the pin is used for industrial trailers) and tied the recovery rope, strap, cable around the "pin" section of the towmaster tow hitch, would that be strong enough to serve as a recovery point?
    Last edited by 4ePajero; 2007/11/26 at 05:51 PM.

  3. #83
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Parklands, Cape Town
    Age
    39
    Posts
    680
    Thanked: 1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fontuin View Post
    Just a question.

    A Defender's "drop plate" is bolted to the chassis at the top and it is reinforced horizontally by two lengths of angle iron bolted to the chassis underneath the vehicle. It is rated to tow a braked trailer of up to 3.5 tons. If one used a "towmaster" tow hitch (similar to what trucks and tractors use to tow with, it has a ball at the top of a thick pin, the pin is used for industrial trailers) and tied the recovery rope, strap, cable around the "pin" section of the towmaster tow hitch, would that be strong enough to serve as a recovery point?
    What bugs me with that is two things, what sort of bolts where used, and especially with the top ones, where are they attached, if its just held by the 2mm plate bumper I would say no. Big difference in an instantaneous non moving load and one that is on wheels I reckon. Plus I think its save to say that when recovering a 2Ton vehicle that the load far exceeds 3.5 tons.
    Currently: 2009 Mitsubishi Triton 3.2 D/C 4x4
    Previously: 1996 LR Defender 110 V8



  4. #84
    4ePajero Guest

    Default

    Sorry for the long post .... but this is serious stuff!

    This thread is very disturbing, especially the loss of life and bodily injuries.

    It is easy to scoff at the stupidity of the people in the original post, but it is clear from what I've read here that it is a very dangerous operation (snatching).

    I have to admit that I have not done it (snatching), nor have I been snatched out of a stuck situation, but I fully understand the forces involved.

    My take on it is as follows:
    • One has to assume that there will be a failure somewhere, some time. That is the design parameter. It is foolhardy to assume that if you have the right equipment and use the correct techniques that there will never be a failure.
    • The aim of safety equipment will be to safely dissipate the energy stored in the process, with the least damage to people, vehicles and equipment.
    • In the examples cited, the energy was absorbed by either the vehicle's body, chassis, bonnet, wind screen or (unfortunately by people's bodies).
    alanB calculated that the velocity of the rope / shackle / tow hook hitting the vehicle can be in the vicinity of 200-350 km/h. Lets take the 350 km/h as correct.
    For physics a more relevant speed is m/s. 350 km/h = 97 m/s.

    Let's assume that the mass of the projectile (shackle / tow hook) is 1.5 kg.

    The momentum of the projectile is

    M = V * mass

    where
    M = momentum in kg m/s
    V = velocity in m/s
    mass = mass in kg

    thus

    M = 97 * 1.5
    = 145.5 kg m/s

    To reduce the momentum, we have to either reduce the velocity, or increase the mass of the projectile after it has been launched.


    To reduce the velocity will take a physical barrier (as we have seen in the thread).
    The blanket / strap wrapped around the snatch rope attempts to reduce the velocity and increase the mass (by attaching the wrapped item to the projectile).
    Air resistance comes into the equation as well, but let's ignore that for a moment.
    The evidence shows that these methods are not sure-fire ways of reducing the momentum.



    If we can increase the mass of the projectile to say 10kg, the momentum has to stay equal (law of conservation of energy), and the new velocity can be calculated:

    from our original formula:

    M = V * mass
    we get
    V = M / mass

    thus with
    M = 145.5 kg m/s
    mass = 10 kg
    V = 145.5 / 10
    = 14.6 m/s
    = 53 km / h

    (I'll come back to this figure later.)

    My question is as follows:

    If we can design ballast bags (weighing approx. 10 kg) to be attached close to the ends of the rope in such a way that the end cannot "shoot" right through it, we can solve the problem.

    My suggestion is as follows:
    • a bag made of either tough canvas or leather
    • filled with sand / soil
    • attached to the rope with eg a wing-nut, clamp etc., or even securely fixed to the shackle itself.
    • fitted close to the end, where movement (due to the snatching) is the least
    • combined with a blanket, for the event of a fracture of the rope itself, between the ballast bags.
    The idea is that, in the event of a failure, the rope is caught up in the ballast bag.
    The ballast bag now has to be accelerated with the projectile.
    Put differently, the ballast bag will act as a brake on the projectile.
    Even if that is achieved without any loss of energy, the velocity is reduced to 53 km/h, which should not penetrate the body / wind screen.

    Back to the 53 km/h.
    With the loss of energy associated with the rope being caught up with the bag, the loss of energy will be significant.
    alanB can make a calc on the expected losses, but I would guess at least 50% of the energy could be dissipated in this process, leaving us with a velocity of 25-30 km/h.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  5. #85
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Pretoria
    Age
    62
    Posts
    508
    Thanked: 0

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 4ePajero View Post
    alanB calculated that the velocity of the rope / shackle / tow hook hitting the vehicle can be in the vicinity of 200-350 km/h. Lets take the 350 km/h as correct.
    [...]
    If we can design ballast bags (weighing approx. 10 kg) to be attached close to the ends of the rope in such a way that the end cannot "shoot" right through it, we can solve the problem.
    [..]
    With the loss of energy associated with the rope being caught up with the bag, the loss of energy will be significant.
    alanB can make a calc on the expected losses, but I would guess at least 50% of the energy could be dissipated in this process, leaving us with a velocity of 25-30 km/h.
    I have seen another system to make snatches/recoveries safer. Works like this:
    1. The snatch strap/rope/winch cable is connected to the recovery point via a tree protector type strap looped through the rope's end.
    2. Also threaded through the rope's end is a length (single or doubled or tripled) of ski-rope or mountaineer's rope.
    3. The ends of this rope is attached to the body at a suitable point/points (NOT the same recovery point as the tree protector) in such a way that the tree protector strap takes all the load.
    4. This is supposed to be done at both ends of the snatch strap (or at the dangerous end of the winch rope) It also assumes that the actual recovery ropes/straps and shackles are rated sufficiently high.
    The additional rope just hangs in there and its only function in life is to break or arrest the the snatch strap's end in case of failure. The beauty of this is that even a moderate-strength single strand of ski-rope or manilla rope will in 99% of breakage case arrest the speeding projectile so much that it falls between the vehicles, even if the rope itself breaks in the process.

  6. #86
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Pune
    Age
    41
    Posts
    6,388
    Thanked: 60

    Default

    That's what we do, make use of safety straps or ropes as per the video I posted in this thread,
    http://www.4x4community.co.za/forum/...ad.php?t=14219

    Here are some of the straps and ropes I use for safety:

  7. #87
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    JHB
    Age
    54
    Posts
    629
    Thanked: 0

    Default

    Hmm some nice ideas!

    The key thing I realised when working through the velocity calc's is the stretch in the kinetic strap/rope (the same applies to a stretched steel winch rope). As long as the rope is stretched there is stored energy available to accelerate any attached mass. The aim of any safety device IMO must be firstly to allow the rope to unstrech itself without adding any additional mass to the system which can also be accelerated and thus become another projectile and only then after the rope is slack act as some sort of a brake on the moving mass/es.

    The safety straps Zantus and I use do this but only partly becuase they are not long enough I dont think, after thinking it all through, (the straps I use are 1.5m long), depending on how you attach them to the vehicle etc there may only be about 1m slack in the safety strap. If you assume the kinetic strap has been stretched by 2m then the safety strap will allow 1m of stretch to be released, but there is still 1m of stretch left in the rope. In my original estimate of velocity, if all the other assumptions hold that means the force in the rope halves (F=kx and x is now 1 m instead of 2m), then:
    If the safety strap then fails (mine have a 1 ton safe working limit which is the same as the assumed force in the rope at 1m stretch so failure is possible in my theoretical scenario), the same calcs yield a velocity of the towball of 207km/h before it starts slowing down so impact velocity will be somewhere between 50 and 75% of that which is still life threatening.

    All this assumes the pulling vehilcle stops dead at the moment of failure and doesnt keep pulling which makes all these safety precautions meaningless because the snatch rope will then be stretched to its full extent when the safety strap fails and the velocity of any broken off parts will be maximised.

    My conclusions then are that you need saftey straps that are either very strong (10 ton rating for eg, but then so must the attachement point of the safety strap on the vehicle be capable of handling that force) or very long, as long or longer than the maximum stretch of the kinetic strap or rope which is the preferred option I think. With a long safety strap, the stored energy is allowed to dissapate and then the flying projectile brought to a halt (provided it isnt too heavy because then you have a kinetic energy issue).

    The more I think about this, a recovery bridal (see attached pic) is the perfect thing IMO because its quite long and very strong. Also any broken off recovery point will be attached to the bridal and thus shouldnt go flying anywhere. It also almost halves the force on any recovery point.
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Last edited by alanB; 2007/11/27 at 09:03 AM. Reason: corrected calculation and learnt how to spell "stretch"

  8. #88
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    East Rand
    Age
    47
    Posts
    313
    Thanked: 0

    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by alanB View Post
    The more I think about this, a recovery bridal (see attached pic) is the perfect thing IMO because its quite long and very strong. Also any broken off recovery point will be attached to the bridal and thus shouldnt go flying anywhere. It also almost halves the force on any recovery point.
    Very good point! You should thus have two in your kit, in case your "recoverer" does not have one.

  9. #89
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Pretoria
    Age
    59
    Posts
    7,447
    Thanked: 862

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by alanB View Post
    ... but there is still 1m of strech left in the rope.
    Two things to keep into consideration. If you draw a graph of force over stretch, the resultant plot is not a straight line, but a progressive upward curve with most of the force developing at the end of the stretch. Depending on the material in use the potential energy in the strap at half stretch could be as little as 10% of total.

    When the strap breaks, the strap would have applied most of it's force to what ever it is attached to, and that would have stopped most vehicles dead in its tracks.

    All of the safety devices mentioned above would work well under most circumstances.
    Sakkie Coetzee

    Some people say I have a "short temper"....I see it as swift and assertive reaction to Bull!

  10. #90
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Kempton Park
    Age
    52
    Posts
    13,859
    Thanked: 983

    Default

    if only your rope hits you, chances are it will break legs etc. The BIG problem is when you have a shackle, towbar etc still connected to the rope and the recovery point breaks, dan het jy groot moeilikheid!!. The rope itself is dangerous, but because of its weight has not got that much momentum, i.o.w your windscreen should stop the rope [without heavy attachments]
    Turnkey Construction Projects, Commercial, industrial, Domestic
    Importers: Diving gear, Compressed air cylinders for diving and airgun industry, 4x4 equipment.
    Manufacturers: Pofadder Kinetic ropes, Recovery kits, Synthetic winch ropes
    Vehicles: Modifications and installations, Special application vehicles
    Driver training: 4x4, Defensive
    [email protected]
    +27824453301

  11. #91
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    JHB
    Age
    54
    Posts
    629
    Thanked: 0

    Default

    Two things to keep into consideration. If you draw a graph of force over stretch, the resultant plot is not a straight line, but a progressive upward curve with most of the force developing at the end of the stretch. Depending on the material in use the potential energy in the strap at half stretch could be as little as 10% of total.
    Ja sure! I was assuming a "normal" linear spring.

    I dont know precisely how kinetic ropes stretch. I doubt if the force is only 10% at 50% stretch though but I'm guessing. But your point is valid though. I'm sure synthetic materials stretch non linearly and thus the force is likely to be lower than 50% of maximum at 50% stretch.
    Last edited by alanB; 2007/11/27 at 09:21 AM. Reason: grammar

  12. #92
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Kempton Park
    Age
    52
    Posts
    13,859
    Thanked: 983

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fontuin View Post
    Just a question.

    A Defender's "drop plate" is bolted to the chassis at the top and it is reinforced horizontally by two lengths of angle iron bolted to the chassis underneath the vehicle. It is rated to tow a braked trailer of up to 3.5 tons. If one used a "towmaster" tow hitch (similar to what trucks and tractors use to tow with, it has a ball at the top of a thick pin, the pin is used for industrial trailers) and tied the recovery rope, strap, cable around the "pin" section of the towmaster tow hitch, would that be strong enough to serve as a recovery point?
    towing a 3t trailer and snatching where you can break a 8t rope is 2 different things in terms of stresses on towbars. so the awnser is ......NO NO NO . Go spend R2000 on decent recovery gear and recovery points and use HT bolts.[10.9 and up]
    Turnkey Construction Projects, Commercial, industrial, Domestic
    Importers: Diving gear, Compressed air cylinders for diving and airgun industry, 4x4 equipment.
    Manufacturers: Pofadder Kinetic ropes, Recovery kits, Synthetic winch ropes
    Vehicles: Modifications and installations, Special application vehicles
    Driver training: 4x4, Defensive
    [email protected]
    +27824453301

  13. #93
    4ePajero Guest

    Default

    The more I think about this, a recovery bridal (see attached pic) is the perfect thing IMO because its quite long and very strong. Also any broken off recovery point will be attached to the bridal and thus shouldnt go flying anywhere. It also almost halves the force on any recovery point.
    I like the idea, especially because the chances (and physics) of both recovery points breaking at exactly the same moment are virtually impossible.

    Do you just thread the bridle through the loop at the end of the snatch rope?

    The length (of the bridle) is important, I think, so that in the event of a failure, the tow vehicles can stop before the bridle is "unwound" from the snatch rope and ricochets back into the tow vehicle.

    The down-side is that the recovered vehicle will need two recovery points.

  14. #94
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    JHB
    Age
    54
    Posts
    629
    Thanked: 0

    Default

    Do you just thread the bridle through the loop at the end of the snatch rope?

    The length (of the bridle) is important, I think, so that in the event of a failure, the tow vehicles can stop before the bridle is "unwound" from the snatch rope and ricochets back into the tow vehicle.
    Yes you just thread the bridal through the loop at the end of the kinetic strap.

    Mine is 3m in total (thats slightly less than 1.5m when connected up). Its rated at 10t safe working load.

    As you say if the pulling vehicle doesnt stop at the moment of failure but just keeps going it maximises all the potential forces and velocities. This is actually a problem becuase with the snatch strap streching you dont feel much in the pulling vehicle, its all quite smooth. In the ASPW video they say you should first drive very slowly away from the stuck vehicle before pulling in earnest and mark the point where the snatch strap is stretched to its maximum before reversing and pulling in earnest during which you should halt after reaching the point of maximum stretch if the stick vehicle hasnt popped out. Although this logic seems flawed to me because if the rope is stretched then the force is there so if you manage to stretch the rope to its maximum by driving very slowly then the stuck vehicle will probably pop out, if it doesnt then you are in the danger area already.

  15. #95
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Uitenhage
    Age
    40
    Posts
    1,809
    Thanked: 375

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Engel View Post
    towing a 3t trailer and snatching where you can break a 8t rope is 2 different things in terms of stresses on towbars. so the awnser is ......NO NO NO . Go spend R2000 on decent recovery gear and recovery points and use HT bolts.[10.9 and up]
    I understand that the forces involved when snatching are a lot greater than when towing. I mention the 3.5 ton towing capasity simply because it gives an indication that the hitch is a lot stronger than average. I'm sure it's actual load capacity is far higher than 3.5 tons as any hitches capacity would be far higher than the vehicles towing specification.

    I think from what I have learnt from this very interesting thread is that the problem with a tow hitch is that it is not always attached to the chassis, the bolts are not always strong enough and the forces on the hcth are not always close to horizontal due to the point where the strap is attached and the way the hitch is attached to the vehicle(drop plates etc). Any combination of the above factors would cause the hitch to come loose from the vehicle?

    What I am really getting at is, if you attach a towmaster tow hitch directly to the chassis using HT bolts and attach the rope, strap, cable to the pin part as opposed to the ball part(to keep the forces horizontal), is it not effectively the same as and as strong as attaching a steel hook directly to the chassis using HT bolts and attaching the strap, rope, cable to that?

    Is it not the way that the hitch is attached to the vehicle that makes it unsafe as a recovery point rather than that it is a hitch, or is the actual hitch the problem or are there other factors that I am not taking into consideration that are problem?

    I am by no means against spending time and money on a decent recovery point, I agree that it is vital to do so, it is again just a question?

  16. #96
    4ePajero Guest

    Default

    Although this logic seems flawed to me because if the rope is stretched then the force is there so if you manage to stretch the rope to its maximum by driving very slowly then the stuck vehicle will probably pop out, if it doesn't then you are in the danger area already.
    Is the snatching supposed to be done in such a way as to NOT stretch the strap to it's limits, or is the "stretch" only to soften the tug?

    My logic says the kinetic strap should never be stretched to it's limit.

    On this site

    http://www.grassrootsjeepclub.com/techpagetwo.htm

    I found this:

    (I marked one paragraph in red, which confirms my logic of never exceeding the stretch limit of your snatch strap).

    What size recovery strap do I need for my Jeep?
    The recovery strap size you need is based on the trail ready weight of your vehicle plus the potential speed you will be driving your Truck during the recovery.
    The Energy that is built up and multiplied in a Strap during recovery is called Kinetic Energy.
    The Mathamatical formula to calculate the potential Kinetic energy
    your truck wil generate during a pull is as follows
    E = 1/2(MV²)
    Where E is Energy = one half the product of the Mass (M) times it's Velocity (V) Squared.
    In this example lets say that: Your truck weighs in at exactly 5,000 lbs fully loaded with you in it. Mass = 5,000 lbs. Your velocity is 2 MPH (V = 2 MPH), V squared: 2.00x2.00 = 4.00, times 5,000 lbs = 20,000 lbs divided by 1/2 = 10,000 lbs roughly equal to the WWL (Working Load Limit) of a good 3/4" Shackle,
    As you can see it doesn't take much to generate a lot of pulling power when using a recovery strap.
    So to choose the right size strap for your truck you need to know how much Kinetic energy you are going to generate during a recovery operation.
    Keep in mind that if your way of freeing a stuck truck is to back all the way back and charge off full throttle until you hit the end of the rope you are going to exceed the rating on most any strap.
    While we are on the subject.
    A good way of determining how strong a pull you are generating is to look at how much you are stretching your strap. To do this once the vehicles are properly rigged together move the vehicle out until the strap is fully extended. Now if you are using one of our straps they are designed to stretch up to 25% so if you are using a 30' strap you would mark the spot 7.5 feet in front of your vehicle and if you reach that point during your pull and the stuck vehicle hasn't moved yet stop, because you are about to overload your strap.

    Aren't all Nylon Recovery Straps made from the same material?
    NO, Some manufacturers use lifting sling material for recovery straps. The difference is that lift sling material is made to stretch a little to cradle the load they are lifting, but they are not designed to store and release energy during a shock load type operation.
    You can generally tell which kind of strap you are looking at by the break strength rating. An example of this is found in 2" Recovery Straps. Some 2" straps come with a rating of 20,000 lb or more. These are Lift Sling straps and have limited energy storing capacity. A 2" Strap designed for Recovery will have a break strength of about 17,000 to 18,000 lbs and will be able to stretch up to 25% of its static length without exceeding its break strength rating.
    The advantage of using a strap designed for recovery is that it allows you to generate more Kinetic energy (i.e. pulling power) in the strap at slower speeds resulting in a safer recovery operation.
    Here's how it works. If the strap you are using does not stretch much then as soon as the strap tightens it starts passing the energy thru to the stuck vehicle and the pulling vehicle. This results in energy being absorbed by the stuck and pulling vehicle over a longer duration but at a lower kinetic energy level. To over come this the pulling truck must increase its pulling speed to shock load the strap.
    A recovery strap which will stretch more expends little energy into the stuck and pulling vehicle during the first part of the pull. The energy is stored in the strap. Like a rubber band being stretched over your finger the farther you pull it back the more energy is stored. This allows energy to build up to a point where there is enough force stored in the strap to overcome the resistance of the stuck vehicle, which then is pulled free.

    What is the Safest way to use a recovery strap to free a stuck vehicle?
    The safest way to use a Recovery strap is to start off slow. Try just pulling out the stuck truck. if that doesn't work give it a little tug. Continue to increase your tug speed a little bit at a time until the truck is free.
    At the same time know the max speed you can tug at and not exceed the break strength of your strap.
    You can also mark the place your truck will be at should you achieve full stretch for the strap you are using. As an example if you are using one of our 30' Recovery Straps it is designed to stretch up to 25% at full pull. this would make the strap 37.5 feet long at full pull. by marking the spot your truck would be at when you got to 37.5 feet you can stop before you overpull and possibly break your strap.

    How do I minimize the risk of Recovery Strap or Winch Cable recoil when in a recovery situation?
    To Minimize the risk of Recoil during a recovery operation allways make sure that the Recovery Strap or Winch Cable/Rope is the weak link in the Recovery equipment chain. That is to say make sure that the vehicle recovery point, the shackles, the snatch/pulley block, etc, all have breaking strenghs higher than the cable, rope or strap.
    Much has been written about the dangers of projectile objects flying thru windshields etc. This is true but in order for that to happen there needs to be a projectile. A recovery rope, winch cable/rope which breaks without something attached to it may snap back but that is not nearly as dangerous as if there is something attached to the end for it to slingshot.
    The bottom line is this always know what the breaking strength of all the components you are using are. If you are working with a shackle or other piece of rigging gear that is only stamped with the WLL (Working Load Limit) assume that the breaking strength is 4 times that amount to be on the safe side.
    One thing to really watch is the attachment point on the vehicles themselves. Never hook to a tow hitch or unreinforced bumper. If you are unsure of any rigging point on a vehicle don't use it. You can always sling a tree strap around the axle and use that as a point if there is nothing on the frame that looks secure.
    For further safety If you think something could fail during a recovery operation and you have to use it. raise the hood and or trunk lid of the vehicles as a shield in case something does go bad on you. It is much better to replace some sheet metal than to need a helicoper ride to the hospital.

  17. #97
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Cape Town
    Age
    45
    Posts
    483
    Thanked: 7

    Exclamation basics

    Quote Originally Posted by Engel View Post
    You cannot snatch with a bonnet open.
    Make sure you have good recovery equipment.
    Add proper recovery points
    Use a blanket on your recovery!
    Add to that: Snatch as a last resort and ALWAYS clear the way for the wheels,
    bumper etc and, if needed, lift the leading end of the vehicle being snatched.

    Safe Trails
    Pixel

  18. #98
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Krugersdorp
    Age
    47
    Posts
    1,928
    Thanked: 104

    Default Snatch Straps

    My 2c as I have not seen anyone else mention this,
    as far as I know snatch straps lose some of their 'elasticity' or stretch with every pull, and should be rested after heavy snatching. If the strap or rope are used repeatedly it eventually acts like a normal rigid tow rope.

    In both the youtube videos in the earlier posts the vehicles being snatched were very badly stuck and the recovery vehicle had a go several times before the snatch strap/rope broke. Are this not due to reasons above?

    KUBU 4X4 TRAILER RENTAL
    083 631 6995
    [email protected]
    www.kubu4x4.co.za
    Click here for the latest updates in the Commercial Section
    Jannie Engelbrecht a.k.a. Granlor

  19. #99
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Port Elizabeth
    Age
    45
    Posts
    1,600
    Thanked: 17

    Angry Stupid.....

    Only saw this vid now.....damn...

    People never learn, no matter how many courses they go on where they are told/taught not to speed, not to recover using the tow hitch...etc

    I have seen vids of guys speeding through dense bush music blasting away one arm steering chatting like it's no problem..and these guys have done the courses but still.....

    Moral of the story is these accidents will happen no matter what common sense dictates, like my Dad always said me, you don't wanna listen then you must feel...sad part is, usually the people around you that suffer.

    Also, how does this happen when it looks like these guys are experienced 4x4'rs doing totally idiotic things and putting peoples lives in danger, if that ball bounced off the car and hit someone

    ah well.....no matter how much I whine.... people will only learn when the ball hits someone square in the face and splits their head in two...

  20. #100
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Kempton Park
    Age
    52
    Posts
    13,859
    Thanked: 983

    Default

    Scart, youre wrong, some people just never learn!!
    Turnkey Construction Projects, Commercial, industrial, Domestic
    Importers: Diving gear, Compressed air cylinders for diving and airgun industry, 4x4 equipment.
    Manufacturers: Pofadder Kinetic ropes, Recovery kits, Synthetic winch ropes
    Vehicles: Modifications and installations, Special application vehicles
    Driver training: 4x4, Defensive
    [email protected]
    +27824453301

Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5

Similar Threads

  1. The Baboon 4x4 Trail Queenstown
    By Big Hilux in forum Eastern Cape
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 2018/12/17, 03:33 PM
  2. Top Gear recovery gone wrong
    By MikeAG in forum The 4x4 Pub
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 2010/12/29, 08:12 AM
  3. Another recovery gone wrong!
    By incrediblebob in forum The 4x4 Pub
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 2010/03/11, 09:46 AM
  4. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 2009/11/09, 01:03 PM
  5. The Rocky Mountain 4x4 Trail
    By Big Hilux in forum Eastern Cape
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 2007/01/21, 07:13 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •