'Last Lions' Filmmaker Applauds Petition to U.S. to List African Lion as Endangered





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  1. #1
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    Exclamation 'Last Lions' Filmmaker Applauds Petition to U.S. to List African Lion as Endangered

    The petition filed with the U.S. Department of Interior by a coalition of wildlife groups to list African lions as Endangered under the U.S. Endangered Species Act has been welcomed by Dereck Joubert, director of the new National Geographic film The Last Lions.
    "This petition comes at a vitally important time when we are looking down the barrel of extinctions of wild lions. Its a shocking tipping point when there are more tigers in captivity than there are in the wild, and what happens to tigers today happens to lions tomorrow," Joubert said in an email.
    "We are releasing our film, The Last Lions, across the United States, at the same time as this petition goes in to the Department of Interior. We endorse the petition, because it's time for a real conversation about this issue at all levels."
    The International Fund for Animal Welfare, The Humane Society of the United States, Humane Society International, Born Free USA, Born Free Foundation and Defenders of Wildlife, filed the petition last week.
    "The population and range of the African lion are in alarming decline," the coalition of wildlife groups noted in a news release. "During the past two decades, the number of African lions has declined by at least 48.5 percent as a result of retaliatory killings, loss of habitat and prey species, over-exploitation by recreational trophy hunters and commercial trade, disease, and other human-caused and natural factors. Today, there are fewer than 40,000 African lions remaining -- most of them in just a handful of countries. Of the remaining populations, two-thirds are neither protected nor viable over the long run."
    "The African lion is facing an uncertain future at best," said Adam Roberts, executive vice president of Born Free USA. "There is a real possibility that more African countries will lose their wild lions altogether if the current situation is not reversed," "Currently, lions are not adequately protected by existing regulatory measures at national, regional or international levels. We need to take urgent measures to conserve the African lion before it's too late."
    The petition documents that international trade in African lions and their parts, including trophy hunting, is playing a role in the reduction of the population. "From 1998 through 2008, at least 7,445 wild lions were traded internationally with the United States importing a minimum of 4,021. Additionally, 64 percent of the 5,663 wild lions
    traded internationally for recreational trophy hunting purposes were imported to the United States," the colation news release explained.
    "The king of the jungle is heading toward extinction, and yet Americans continue to kill lions for sport," said Jeff Flocken, Washington D.C. office director of IFAW. "Our nation is responsible for importing over half of all lions brought home by trophy hunters each year. The African lion is in real trouble and it is time for this senseless killing and unsustainable practice to stop."
    According to the wildlife organizations, despite the significant and continued declines in population and range, the number of lion trophies imported to the United States is increasing.
    "In 2008, trophy imports to the United States were greater than any other year in the preceding decade and more than twice the number in 1999.
    "Listing the African lion as Endangered would generally prohibit the import of lion trophies into the United States, an essential step to reversing the current decline of the population. Moreover, the listing would stop imports of commercially traded lions and lion parts that do not benefit lions in the wild."
    "The United States is the leading importer of lions and lion parts for commercial and recreational trade - this includes skulls, claws, hides, and live lions," said Teresa Telecky, director of the wildlife department at The HSUS. "Americans' thirst for exotic goods and trophies to hang on their walls is driving lions to extinction. The African lion
    simply cannot endure this level of exploitation if their long-term survival is to be ensured."
    Protection under the ESA would also help increase global awareness to the plight of the African lion and may generate additional resources to tackle in-country threats such as poisoning, persecution and habitat
    loss that currently confront wild lions, the wildlife organuzations added.
    "The U.S. government must recognize that African lions are in danger of extinction throughout a significant portion of their range, acknowledge our nation's significant role in the lion's fate and bring greater scrutiny to all factors contributing to the decline of lion populations," said Bob Irvin, senior vice president for conservation programs at Defenders of Wildlife. "The African lion is a vital cultural asset, a symbol of the world's last great vestiges of wildness, and a critical part of healthy ecosystems that must be protected."
    The Secretary of the Interior has 90 days to assess whether an Endangered listing under the ESA may be warranted, 12 months to decide whether to propose listing and then another 12 months to make a final
    decision.

  2. #2
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    When is the film likely to reach SA?

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    Dit is een van die beste en hartseerste movies wat ek al gekyk het. Dink hy is al uit op DVD in US.

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    A good initiative I hope it will have a signal effect also to Europ and ASIA (!!)
    Keep the fingers crossed it will go through.

    I seem to remember that a certain GWB, former president of the US has urged the Botswana government to increase the hunting quota for lions, fortunately the government resisted this time and we can see those manificient creaters in the wild.

    Unfortunately, there are still too many hunting concessions targeting trophy profits and accelerating the averse effect to the lion population.
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    Exclamation Last Lions film

    I saw yesterday night on local TV - Nat Geo Wild premier in SA for 13th february 2012 !

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    Thanks!

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    First time since April 2010 that I wish to have a TV.
    Is there any chance to see it online?

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    Exclamation Last lions film

    I saw the film on local TV ; as I had mentioned in a previous message it was screen on 13/2/2012 at 7pm ;it was the premiere and I am sure Nat Geo Wild will bring it back again ; try to spot it when next will be showed (tv programme ?); Rgds.

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    If I may...

    How exactly is listing the lion as an endangered species actually going to resolve the following problems:

    Habitat loss: I would say that most of the habitat loss is due to large corporation expansion and pastoral living of indigenous populations... are the poorer African nations REALLY going to say to big international business "shove off with your $$$$ we are saving our lion"? Are they really going to prevent their rural voters from grazing their sheep, goats and cattle? Are they going to arrest those voters when there is a man-eater chomping on their kids and livestock?

    With large scale habitat loss where are these lions going to go and what are they going to feed on. I am not saying that large areas have not been decimated... we should attempt to improve population numbers but if there is not enough land and not enough prey...

    Sale of body parts: Probably illegal in most countries anyway. If not then make it illegal... so now the $200 a poacher got will become $2000 because the demand has risen. A poacher will always be a poacher. They generally are very poor members of society and have a fatalistic outlook on life...they think if they get caught they get caught... increase the money that he might receive and he will more than likely poach more. How do we satisfy the body part market while we tackle problem of re-educating the end users or cracking the syndicates that run these poachers? Dare I mention the swear words of captive lion breeding...

    Trophy Hunting: Limit the quota AND enforce it in every country. If the yanks are really worried about the numbers entering the country then limit the numbers that are allowed to be imported. It's called sustainabilty, not a very complex concept.

    Disease and other human caused and natural factors: Will listing the lion prevent the disease? Will listing the lion prevent the natural factors from occurring?

    As for human factor... As they are not mentioned I can only assume that most of these factors will continue whether the lion is listed or not.

    It would seem, to me, that the main baddie in this article is the hunter... well ethical hunters (not poachers or the odd scumbag with a hunting rifle) are very very very easily controlled. Quotas are set and there are therefore only a certain number available to the hunter every year. If the USA thinks its residents are killing too many they can limit the number of imports.

    Sorry to say but wildlife must pay for itself. Look what we have accomplished with regards to our wildlife industry. If we want to protect our "protected national park" lion populations then we must increase the global population size. This will only be done by intensive captive breeding populations. Proper policing of these populations will ensure that ethical hunts not canned hunts are carried out and the welfare of those populations are ensured. Make it a business and leave it to the private sector (like the current game farm model) and the populations will improve.

    Lastly I wholeheartedly agree that the lion numbers are worrying and must improve but I think once again the bunny huggers are simply pushing their agenda and crying for legislation without engaging thier brain.

    IMHO
    Last edited by gazza1210; 2012/03/01 at 11:32 AM.
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  10. #10
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    Just for info ; tyou will find in the intranet the complete text of the petition /presentation wrt african lion listing as an endangered species in the USA;.
    In my opinion it is a very compreensive piece of work since it covers the whole of africa supported by scientific data ;a while ago i also found another thesis type of work but about the free range lion population in mozambique ; for us biltong hunters both are very interesting to read !
    Rgds.

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