Electrickery for camping - Page 5




Page 5 of 26 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 ... LastLast
Results 81 to 100 of 514
  1. #81
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Working in Limpopo to pay the bank in Strand
    Age
    49
    Posts
    1,136
    Thanked: 154

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisF View Post
    Thanks for all the feedback.

    I have had an absolute flood of PM's regarding this thread. Some I will deal with later, as I would have to take my time to prepare a proper reply.

    Here is one of the PM's I received (name with held, afterall it was a private message). I am answering here as I believe the answer relates to more people -

    1. Can you please send me the updated PDF document of your article. - the pdf is attached to the first post of this thread
    2. I bought my Prado and think the setup is done the OLD way, without the dc2dc . I am quite ignorant so please help. I bought an NL Portable Power Pack and an Deltec 105Ah deep cycle battery during 2012, which is fitted in the Offroad trailer. Does this NL-system now do the same as the dc2dc CTEK ?? Or would you advise I add an dc2dc unit?
    I keep this NL b0x with the battery connected to electricity via an CTEK Pro Battery charger MXS10 on a constant basis when not in use. In spite of this I found that the battery now only can run my fridge( only) for about 30hours versus 48 hours when new?? Am I doing something wrong??
    We are doing a single vehicle trip through Kaokoland in August and do not want to be stranded with no fridge/ or battery problems.


    Regarding the battery in the trailer - due to the long cable runs it is highly unlikely that the alternator can charge it. A dc2dc system is recommended. In fact, for those that dont have the skills for this, look at the trailer kits sold by HcDP ....


    You PM also talks of a 2nd battery and NL kit for the Prado. Battery in the front of the Prado ? In this case the NL kit could work - bearing in mind it is just a solenoid with a timer function, ie NOT a dc2dc charger. IF the battery is in the back of the Prado, I would recommend a dc2dc charger.

    The battery is now only 2 years old and only delivers for 30 hours compared to its original 48 hours .... Sadly for most of us a 2nd battery is an item that only WORKS 2 or 3 weeks per year. Batteries dont like standing idle.


    I just dont know enough about batteries to comment on your battery question - lost my previous battery in a very similar manner.

    If I may comment on battery power vs refrigerator runtime (I have been in refrigeration for 26 years and at one time worked for a company that built off-road refrigeration units)

    Asking about how many hours of runtime a battery will provide is like asking how long is a piece of string. Modern day 220vAC / 12vDC compressors have come a long way as far as energy efficiency goes but it is still somewhat up to the owner of the fridge to get maximum runtime from the 12v power source, in this case to be the deep cycle battery. Rule of thumb would be for a Danfoss BD35 compressor (which I tend to use to provide calculations) to run continuously for 18 hours non-stop, would drain a fully charged 105ah deep cycle batt in this time span. Some people might get 2-3 hours less and some would get 2-3 hours more but this is basically what you are looking at.

    So, in order for you to get more out of your power source would be manually to MANAGE your refrigerator runtime. If your engine is running and the batt is charging, you would have no problem in providing the correct and sufficient power to run the refrigerator. However, when your engine is switched off, the fun and games begin. So, good advice would be to set your thermostat (temp controller) to the coldest setting while the engine is providing the battery with charge and when you stop to overnight, set the temp to a higher setting like -2 to reduce runtime of the compressor. Some people even switch the fridge off completely at night or "stagger the runtime from the battery alone for a few hours and then switch it off. When you drive further again the next day, re-set the thermostat to the coldest setting to freeze up and replenish lost temp due to the reduced night runtime or even when it was switched off completely.

    You need to get the most out of the battery and refrigeration as possible. Off course, this is not where it stops. Stainless Steel fridges are very nice looking but S/S attracts and relays heat very, very well. So a S/S fridge standing in the sun all day will require almost a third more runtime to maintain temp that a normal white fridge unless off course it is protected in some or other manner from direct sunlight. Thickness of insulation is also a very important factor to consider when buying an off-road fridge. the thicker the insulation, the better is maintains and hold temperature. Minimal opening and closing of the lid as well as making sure that the lid and the lid-seal seals properly is of utmost importance in temperature maintenance. Correct packing of the contents of the fridge in the order of how you will be taking items out can save quite a lot and reduces prolonged opening of the lid in order to "search" for the products you require for the day and by this losing valuable temperature inside the fridge. Pre-freezing of items needs not to be explained and if you are buying and stocking up on fresh supplies on your journey, learn to pack it at the bottom of the freezer as this will be the coldest place in the freezer.
    Water or and form of liquid takes the absolute most refrigeration demand (Measured in BTU's) to cool down. If you are in a habit to add ambient temp water in large quantities into the freezer/fridge for drinking purposes, it will make the compressor work much harder to cool it down thus prolonging the compressor runtime by a whole lot more, which obviously will drain even more power from the power source.

    There is so much more info on this and I'm sure most forumites know this and act accordingly, but I hope this might help a few out there to help manage the bushpower availability and fridge operations.
    '13 Toyota Hilux 4x4 XCab

  2. #82
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Bellville
    Age
    49
    Posts
    12,214
    Thanked: 833

    Default

    Cost of a dual battery system ?

    Jip, this is another one of those questions that pop up OFTEN.


    The big ticket items is easy to price, 10 minutes on Google on this 9th day of June 2014 provided me with the following prices. I did not phone around for best prices, I did not check quality, so this is just a rough guide :
    12V 12A dc2dc HcdP – R 1 250
    12V 30A dc2dc HcdP – R 2 575
    Ctek 250 S – R 3 900
    80W solar panel – R900
    105A.h deep cycle maintenance free battery – R 1 500


    It is easy to think the cost is 3 900 + 900x2 + 1500 = R 7 200 ... NOT SO !

    The cables aint cheap, and if you are going to buy it "by the meter" for a small project you will be paying PREMIUM prices !

    Those silly little connectors - I paid R3-90 EACH last Saturday !!

    From R50 PER Brad Harison connector !!

    R35 for the fuse holder, then another couple of notes for the fuses ..

    even now the LED lights are another couple of hundred rand ...

    the list of "small stuff" just does not stop ....


    And if you want it installed ... well the old saying "You get what you pay for" is ever true !! To do this type of installation PROPERLY is VERY labour intensive !!!!!! and labour aint cheap .....


    If somebody charges you a "few hundred rand" to install a complete system, including solar panels and distribution setup ... uhm ja, either he is getting the parts at a massive discount or he is going to cut corners ...

  3. #83
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Hillcrest, Malaysia
    Age
    61
    Posts
    16,063
    Thanked: 2200

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisF View Post
    Cost of a dual battery system ?

    Jip, this is another one of those questions that pop up OFTEN.


    The big ticket items is easy to price, 10 minutes on Google on this 9th day of June 2014 provided me with the following prices. I did not phone around for best prices, I did not check quality, so this is just a rough guide :
    12V 12A dc2dc HcdP – R 1 250
    12V 30A dc2dc HcdP – R 2 575
    Ctek 250 S – R 3 900
    80W solar panel – R900
    105A.h deep cycle maintenance free battery – R 1 500


    It is easy to think the cost is 3 900 + 900x2 + 1500 = R 7 200 ... NOT SO !

    The cables aint cheap, and if you are going to buy it "by the meter" for a small project you will be paying PREMIUM prices !

    Those silly little connectors - I paid R3-90 EACH last Saturday !!

    From R50 PER Brad Harison connector !!

    R35 for the fuse holder, then another couple of notes for the fuses ..

    even now the LED lights are another couple of hundred rand ...

    the list of "small stuff" just does not stop ....


    And if you want it installed ... well the old saying "You get what you pay for" is ever true !! To do this type of installation PROPERLY is VERY labour intensive !!!!!! and labour aint cheap .....


    If somebody charges you a "few hundred rand" to install a complete system, including solar panels and distribution setup ... uhm ja, either he is getting the parts at a massive discount or he is going to cut corners ...
    ADD

    Lugs, terminals, heatshrink, cable glands, cable ties, isolators/switches/breakers, Hella sockets, cigarette sockets, Meter (either DVM for manual use/installation/fault-finding, or panel mount for fixed)

    Mounting brackets/hardware for battery and charger and other bits and pieces.
    Cheers

    ZS5KAD Yeasu Ft-897D
    2 V8's a V6 and an inline 4
    The nice thing about going the extra mile - the road is never congested.

  4. #84
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Clanwilliam
    Age
    61
    Posts
    415
    Thanked: 3

    Default

    Chris
    This is the answer that I originally wanted from you. So if I am for example, going to be in the bush in Namibia for, let's say 5 days, with no access to electricity, my 130w panel, as supplied by the caravan builder, plus 1 deep cycle battery, is not going to even be near enough.
    This is now I understand it, I have zero knowledge when it comes to systems like this, that is why I and others come to reply on guys like you for help, lest we make a very expensive mistake.
    In my stupid calculations, I will probably need two deepcycle batteries plus at least 2 x 120W panels. Please correct me if I'm wrong here.
    It's pointless to pay R6000 for the manufacturer supplied 130W panel, when it's not going to do the job. So I might as well pay a bit more now and have the knowledge that I will probably have enough power.
    Once again, please correct me if I'm wrong, and help with what you thing may be enough.
    Thanks!!!!
    LR Discovery 4 TD V6 SE
    Bush-Lapa Boskriek B 333
    " Kriekie "

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to cherokee235 For This Useful Post:


  6. #85
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Clanwilliam
    Age
    61
    Posts
    415
    Thanked: 3

    Default

    I have also read up that the LEAD CRYSTAL batteries are much better. Double the price, but in the long run, probably cheaper.
    They say that the life span is in excess of 10 yrs, it does not mind standing idle, and charges much quicker than normal batteries.

    Your thoughts please
    LR Discovery 4 TD V6 SE
    Bush-Lapa Boskriek B 333
    " Kriekie "

  7. #86
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Bellville
    Age
    49
    Posts
    12,214
    Thanked: 833

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cherokee235 View Post
    Chris
    This is the answer that I originally wanted from you. So if I am for example, going to be in the bush in Namibia for, let's say 5 days, with no access to electricity, my 130w panel, as supplied by the caravan builder, plus 1 deep cycle battery, is not going to even be near enough.
    This is now I understand it, I have zero knowledge when it comes to systems like this, that is why I and others come to reply on guys like you for help, lest we make a very expensive mistake.
    In my stupid calculations, I will probably need two deepcycle batteries plus at least 2 x 120W panels. Please correct me if I'm wrong here.
    It's pointless to pay R6000 for the manufacturer supplied 130W panel, when it's not going to do the job. So I might as well pay a bit more now and have the knowledge that I will probably have enough power.
    Once again, please correct me if I'm wrong, and help with what you thing may be enough.
    Thanks!!!!
    I WISH the answer was straight forward !!


    Let's say you have one fridge/freezer, and you have a dual charger, and let's say you will be driving TWO hours per day - that means you already have 40A.h from the Ctek. Now let's make one more assumption - you are going in the worst heat of summer and you need about 100A.h, ie another 60A.h

    My two off 80W panels deliver more than that per day in summer


    I know at least three members of this forum that use the 2x80W system, and that regularly go to Kgalagadi in SUMMER, and their systems works perfectly.





    the problems start when people see there is power and then go wild with charging laptops and other gadgets .... you DO have a limited power supply, dont waste it. Rather charge your electronics "in car" (from the main battery) while driving ....


    anything outside of peak summer one may be tempted to say the fridge does not work as hard .... but nor does your solar panel ....



    moral of the story - 2x80W is enough, just dont waste it.

  8. #87
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Bellville
    Age
    49
    Posts
    12,214
    Thanked: 833

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cherokee235 View Post
    I have also read up that the LEAD CRYSTAL batteries are much better. Double the price, but in the long run, probably cheaper.
    They say that the life span is in excess of 10 yrs, it does not mind standing idle, and charges much quicker than normal batteries.

    Your thoughts please
    Please see Mistral/s post in this regard.



    Based on what Mistral says my next battery will also be a Lead Crystal ... but at present I dont have any experience of this battery to share.

  9. #88
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Clanwilliam
    Age
    61
    Posts
    415
    Thanked: 3

    Default

    Thanks a million Chris
    I will discuss this option with the supplier of the caravan. Like I said before the caravan comes standard with a 130W roof mounted panel.
    I would rather go with two 85W loose standing panels, like you suggested, that way I get to keep my van in the shade all day. Let me see what they have to say about that.
    Will read up on Mistral's post regarding the lead crystal battery.
    LR Discovery 4 TD V6 SE
    Bush-Lapa Boskriek B 333
    " Kriekie "

  10. #89
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Stellenbosch
    Age
    67
    Posts
    3,629
    Thanked: 218

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cherokee235 View Post
    I have also read up that the LEAD CRYSTAL batteries are much better. Double the price, but in the long run, probably cheaper.
    They say that the life span is in excess of 10 yrs, it does not mind standing idle, and charges much quicker than normal batteries.

    Your thoughts please

    I think none of have the full story yet on lead crystal batteries. On the positive side those of us who do use them are very happy (thus far).

    It is expensive, but all indications are that they perform exceptionally well and they fit the profile of the typical RV user (yes that is us). They are also more forgiving when we do not treat them as we are supposed to.\

    Regardless whether you travel frequently or only once a year, the battery performs well and lives up to expectations - better than any of its rivals it seems. It seems true that in this case you get what you pay for.

    So the feedback is: Yes get the LC.
    Eggie.

    What this country needs more and more, are more unemployed politicians.
    - apology to Edward Langley.

  11. #90
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Pretoria
    Age
    56
    Posts
    8
    Thanked: 0

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cherokee235 View Post
    Thanks a million Chris
    I will discuss this option with the supplier of the caravan. Like I said before the caravan comes standard with a 130W roof mounted panel.
    I would rather go with two 85W loose standing panels, like you suggested, that way I get to keep my van in the shade all day. Let me see what they have to say about that.
    Will read up on Mistral's post regarding the lead crystal battery.
    It all depends on -

    a) what type of panels are you using (they are not all the same quality & efficiency);

    a) what you want to power (i.e. how much energy you need per day)

    Lets look at the panels first, with an assumption of 8 hours usable sunlight per day:

    A typical Tenesol panel of 80W = 4.6 Amps at maximum power x 2 panels = 9.2A x 8 hours = 73,6Amps/day. Hence Chris probably has around 62 Amps/day to play with on his dual 80W panel set-up (assuming 85% of maximum power availability with shade, lower intensity, positioning issues etc.) Of course, if he also drives around, he may then easily have around 100 Amps per day available.

    A typical 130W Kyocera is specced at 7.39 Amps at maximum power = 7.39A x 8 hours = 59,16Amps/day. On the same 85% assumption you would then have around 50 Amps to play with per day.

    Both these figures could of course differ depending on higher panel efficiencies (i.e. parked in the sun and angled correctly all day, good quality panels vs cheap panels) or even with longer usable sunlight hours.

    Now the big question - what does a fridge use per day? Do you really need 100 Amps per day? Overland Forum tested an ARB/Engel 45, National Luna NLR 40, Waeco CF 40 and Fridge-Freeze 45 in 2011 and had the following to say:

    “…
    All of this impressive cooling capacity is fantastic, but at what cost to the power supply? The results from testing the average amperage draw of each unit are useful in determining what effect each model will have on a battery. First we’ll examine the results obtained during the workhorse test, when each unit contained a stock of cans. Note that this was while the motor ran constantly (which all of the fridges did during the workhorse test.) Not surprisingly, the least cold fridge (ARB/Engel) had the lowest power consumption, drawing an average of only 2.60 amps. Second lowest was the FridgeFreeze, at 4.70 amps, followed by the Waeco at 5.05 amps. Predictably, the fastest fridge of the group, the National Luna, used a battery-melting average of 5.75 amps. However, keep in mind that the National Luna only had to run for 2 hours and 44 minutes to achieve its target temperature, compared to almost four hours for the Fridge Freeze. If left to cycle for the same period, the National Luna would average only approximately 1.8 amps. Essentially, the contents in the National Luna cooled 31 percent faster for 1 amp less on average.
    Maintenance cycles were also tested for average power consumption. Each unit was measured after a temperature between 28ºF and 32ºF was reached and the compressor went into a cycling mode, operating intermittently to maintain the setpoint on the thermostat. A sample duration of one hour and 40 minutes was measured. The ARB/Engel units were on par with the National Luna as the lowest consumers, at only 1.75 amps average. The FridgeFreeze was next at 2.25 amps, and the Waeco was last using an average of 2.75 amps. This would translate to the following amp-hour consumption for a 24-hour period: 42ah (ARB/Engel, National Luna), 54ah (FridgeFreeze), and 66ah (Waeco).
    All of the fridges have a spike in amperage draw when they are first turned on to get the motor moving. This is interesting to note, as it gives us an idea of how much stress the electronic circuitry endures (albeit briefly) By increasing our sampling rate to 30hz (30 times per second) and taking multiple readings, we measured the following spikes: ARB/Engel: 8.13 amps; FridgeFreeze: 9.00 amps; National Luna: 10.00 amps; Waeco: 9.52 amps…”

    Unfortunately, I have no idea what the ambient temperature was. Also note that these are relatively small units, in other words, not the popular 60l or 70l units often used in off-road campers or trailers (Waeco & National Luna).

    Hence, if you assume your fridge is cold already and you only deplete and not add warm beer and so on, it would seem that for a 40l National Luna you would use around 42 Amps per day, at least according to Overland Forum.

    In any event, assuming your 130W panels provide around 50 Amps and you have a 40l fridge you should be able to make it but there is not a big margin at all.

    For example, if you have a larger fridge (eg 70l) that probably consumes more, with high ambient temperatures in daytime (fridge running longer but also drinking more beer & needing to add warm ones now and then – double whammy – see above how the consumption increases if you add warm stuff), you stand in the shade, and also have other power consuming items (typically water pump, lights, small inverter for charging laptops and cell phones) it all adds up & it would indeed seem that 130W is on the slim side.

    Hence also Chris’ comment that 160W seems to work – on paper at least, it should – giving you a better margin with a bit to spare for lights etc.
    Last edited by Lesk; 2014/06/09 at 06:30 PM.

  12. #91
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Okahandja, Windhoek
    Age
    65
    Posts
    2,902
    Thanked: 198

    Default

    I would reckon 8 hour efficient power from a solar is maybe too high. Rather work on 6 hours and if you track the sun on 7 hours.
    Johan Kriel

    LC's; PU, SW and Prado

  13. #92
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Hillcrest, Malaysia
    Age
    61
    Posts
    16,063
    Thanked: 2200

    Default

    We are at risk of getting into Analysis Paralysis here.

    It is almost impossible to design for all user profiles, weather condition, solar panel, charger battery, fridge/freezer load combinations.

    As Chris says, 2 x 80W panels, a decent MPPT solar/vehicle charger and one decent battery will suit just about everybody under most user and weather profiles.

    The system he uses wouldn't be my choice, but I can't fault it.
    Cheers

    ZS5KAD Yeasu Ft-897D
    2 V8's a V6 and an inline 4
    The nice thing about going the extra mile - the road is never congested.

  14. #93
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Pretoria
    Age
    56
    Posts
    8
    Thanked: 0

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fluffy View Post
    We are at risk of getting into Analysis Paralysis here.

    It is almost impossible to design for all user profiles, weather condition, solar panel, charger battery, fridge/freezer load combinations.

    As Chris says, 2 x 80W panels, a decent MPPT solar/vehicle charger and one decent battery will suit just about everybody under most user and weather profiles.

    The system he uses wouldn't be my choice, but I can't fault it.
    Agreed

  15. #94
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Stellenbosch
    Age
    67
    Posts
    3,629
    Thanked: 218

    Default

    Thanks Lesk, a good write-up and to the point.

    Analysis Paralysis or not, it is good to see that theory and practice can be matched occasionally. I also confirm that my 170W system does the job very well and leaves some extra room to make ice, charge the laptop and even use an electric blankie every now & then.
    Eggie.

    What this country needs more and more, are more unemployed politicians.
    - apology to Edward Langley.

  16. #95
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Hartebeespoort dam
    Age
    43
    Posts
    17
    Thanked: 0

    Default

    Thanks for the write up Chris.
    Only one question, where did you buy the 1st of the 2 crimping tools you show in your photos? I have tried various distributors, electrical wholesalers, google. Just cannot get a proper set, and it is the absolute weak point of my whole setup.
    2008 F250 D/C... Diesel Alcoholic!

  17. #96
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Vanderbijlpark
    Age
    48
    Posts
    2
    Thanked: 0

    Default

    Hi there all,

    Firstly GREAT post Chris. What I would like to know, I have read a lot about using dc2dc chargers and lots of comments was made regarding the slower rate of charge when a battery was fully discharged due to the lower maximum amps that the unit delivers. Is this a concern? How long do you expect will a dc2dc charger require to charge a battery from let's say 11.9 Volt (40%) charge according to your chart to being fully charged again This will probably not be an issue if you travel for say 8 hours from one camp site to the next, but what about shorter trips? I do not currently have the capital for a solar system.

  18. #97
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Stellenbosch
    Age
    67
    Posts
    3,629
    Thanked: 218

    Default

    About 3 hours to get to around 80/90% full. After that the "complete" charging is a lot slower. It also depends on the type of battery you have.

    Edit: Assuming you have a D250S and a little faster with the higher current devices from HCdP.
    Eggie.

    What this country needs more and more, are more unemployed politicians.
    - apology to Edward Langley.

  19. #98
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Vanderbijlpark
    Age
    48
    Posts
    2
    Thanked: 0

    Default

    Sorry, should have added this to my question as well.

    Also, working with round figures, let's assume that you run a fridge drawing 5 amps will this not only leave 15 Amps (on the 20 Amps charger you mentioned) available for charging. Is there not a solution available that will allow your alternator to do the initial charge and then when the 2nd battery is say 80% charged will allow the dc2dc charger to take over and fully charge the battery. I know this will once again require thicker cables at higher cost, but worth while if it will work.

  20. #99
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Hillcrest, Malaysia
    Age
    61
    Posts
    16,063
    Thanked: 2200

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hallojulle View Post
    Sorry, should have added this to my question as well.

    Also, working with round figures, let's assume that you run a fridge drawing 5 amps will this not only leave 15 Amps (on the 20 Amps charger you mentioned) available for charging. Is there not a solution available that will allow your alternator to do the initial charge and then when the 2nd battery is say 80% charged will allow the dc2dc charger to take over and fully charge the battery. I know this will once again require thicker cables at higher cost, but worth while if it will work.
    Yes there is a solution.

    Its called a static bypass switch. During charge it lets the full output of the charger charge the battery and runs the load/s from the alternator directly.

    The HCPD panel has that facility built in. The Ctek 250 option requires you to add an addition unit that costs a few grand.
    Cheers

    ZS5KAD Yeasu Ft-897D
    2 V8's a V6 and an inline 4
    The nice thing about going the extra mile - the road is never congested.

  21. #100
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Bellville
    Age
    49
    Posts
    12,214
    Thanked: 833

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by liquidg View Post
    Thanks for the write up Chris.
    Only one question, where did you buy the 1st of the 2 crimping tools you show in your photos? I have tried various distributors, electrical wholesalers, google. Just cannot get a proper set, and it is the absolute weak point of my whole setup.
    I bought it at Brights Electrical, its our go-to local hardware store. Actually bought both there.

    http://www.brightsonline.co.za/

Page 5 of 26 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Electrickery
    By Maréchal in forum Land Rover
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 2012/08/06, 09:04 AM
  2. Disco 3 electrickery fundi
    By Will F in forum Land Rover
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 2012/05/16, 08:51 PM
  3. 24v electrickery, help needed
    By ian adams in forum Land Rover
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 2011/08/15, 09:57 AM
  4. Electrickery vs Mechanical Failure
    By Estee in forum Land Rover
    Replies: 77
    Last Post: 2010/11/24, 04:02 PM
  5. Relays, fuses and other electrickery for my fan setup???
    By Barto in forum Vehicle & Technical Chat - General
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 2008/07/22, 11:16 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •